The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Donald Trump"

Showing 1 - 20 of 22

Your search for posts with tags containing Donald Trump found 22 posts

Brains drained: Some thoughts on the Canada 150 Research Chairs

Canadian academics and perhaps a handful of other people will have heard over the last month or so of a new program: the “Canada 150 Research Chairs“. This is a version of the long established Canada Research Chair program, by which generously...
From: memorious on 30 Jul 2017

Donald Trump and Shakespeare

A scene from the New York production of Julius Caesar Shakespeare’s fascination with politics can be seen in many of his plays, not only those directly based on British history. The Roman plays too examine the workings of power, looking at how...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 18 Jun 2017

Trump the Merovingian

Satire is a potent tool in the face of the arrogance of power. Laughter punctures pride more fatally than any righteous anger. And it has not gone unnoticed that one of the winners of the election of the latest US President has been humour itself —...

Moving Targets

To move is to invite suspicion. For the period I study — and perhaps especially in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries — perhaps no word captures the variety of phenomena that exposed marginal people to the scrutiny of...
From: memorious on 23 Feb 2017

On Not Calling Trump Apologists Racist

A few days ago I had a lengthy exchange (on FB, so you know I’m old) with a Trump apologist. It started when a friend of mine posted a story about a Canadian citizen — but, you guessed it, Muslim, and born in Morocco to boot — being...
From: memorious on 19 Feb 2017

Against an Academic Boycott. For Now.

Many colleagues and friends whose ethical and scholarly judgment I greatly respect are calling for an academic boycott of the United States. Or, more specifically, a boycott of US-based academic conferences, which are probably the most frequent...
From: memorious on 9 Feb 2017

Alternatives to Reality: Bush, Trump, Empire, and Alt-Facts

“You’re saying it’s a falsehood and Sean Spicer, our press secretary, gave alternative facts to that.”[1] “We’re an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality. And while you’re studying that reality...
From: memorious on 23 Jan 2017

Providences

I’m not watching the presidential Inauguration today, but I hear that it has started to rain in Washington — a fact that has provoked some bemused Twitter commentary on the judgment of the heavens, as well as one or two calls for...
From: memorious on 20 Jan 2017

Goddamnit, Shakespeare: Venus and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece

“Do you ever get sick of Shakespeare?” my sister-in-law asked me. It was late morning, an unusually rainy day. I was sitting in a reclining chair, Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis open on my lap, and I was making absolutely no progress...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 18 Jan 2017

Uncertainty and the post-truth society

Niccolò Machiavelli knew about the importance of appearances. The word ‘Brexit’ entered the Oxford English Dictionary for the first time this month, only weeks after Donald Trump was elected as the next president of the United States...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 18 Dec 2016

Stewarding a Canadian Culture of Comity

Elizabeth Mancke The election of Donald Trump as US president raises concerns about the impact on Canada: on trade, energy policy, currency exchanges, pipelines, climate change. Most anxiety inducing is the toxic turn of civic discourse, as the US political...
From: Borealia on 6 Dec 2016

Historians under Trump

We are witnessing — more than that, experiencing — events that seem certain to be remembered as a turning point in the history of the United States, part of a series that is changing the political horizons of much of the...
From: memorious on 28 Nov 2016

Shakespeare, Trump, and radical experiments of self-government: The Winter’s Tale

I’ve been preoccupied with two people this year. The first, of course, is William Shakespeare. The other, alack, is Donald Trump. I’ve avoided writing about the latter. It’s not that I don’t see the man everywhere in Shakespeare’s...
From: Shakespeare Confidential on 14 Nov 2016

Shouting with a PhD

My first week of teaching — as a teaching assistant, at Columbia — was the week of September 11, 2001. I was 23, just starting the second year of my PhD, and I’d spent much of the summer frantically reading everything I could to prepare...
From: memorious on 11 Nov 2016

Trump, Surrogatism, and the Death of TV Journalism

From my Northern perch, I’ve been following the US election rather obsessively. From a partisan angle? Of course. If the orange monster gets elected, he will not just wreck his own country. His environmental policies alone would be a complete disaster...
From: dispositio on 16 Sep 2016

Trump and the Myth of Independence, Part

As noted in my last, I’d like to say a little more about a specific thread of Trumpism that seems to have gained traction among people who might not otherwise choose to identify publicly with a bigot. This is the idea that as a super–rich...
From: memorious on 9 Aug 2016

Trumping Shakespeare: Donald Trump, Boris Johnson, and the Rise of the Clown Politician

Trumping Shakespeare: Donald Trump, Boris Johnson, and the Rise of the Clown Politician By Paul Hamilton (This post was originally published as part of the Kingston Shakespeare Seminars) In a May 26, 2016 Los Angeles Times article, entitled“The...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 2 Aug 2016

Trump and the Myth of Independence, Part 1

It’s a cliché that Americans are particularly prone to idolize the wealthy. This is sometimes interpreted as a result of the once-revolutionary belief in meritocracy, an elevation of personal achievement and discipline over the sources of...
From: memorious on 29 Jul 2016

Historians vs Trump 2: Questions in Fish’s Wake

Among the books I’m reading is a work of fairly recondite early modern intellectual history. Bucking once prevalent tendency, the author of this work is at pains to disavow any political context for the intellectual debates s/he traces....
From: memorious on 21 Jul 2016

Stanley Fish, Stop Opining about History

I would have no problem with individuals, who also happened to be historians, disseminating their political conclusions in an op-ed or letter to the editor; but I do have a problem when a bunch of individuals claim for themselves a corporate identity...
From: memorious on 18 Jul 2016

Page 1 of 212Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.