The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Law"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Law found 580 posts

Joseph Greenleaf and “the Council-chamber in Boston”

On 16 Nov 1771, the day after Joseph Greenleaf declined to meet with Gov. Thomas Hutchinson and the Massachusetts Council (on the understandable grounds that his teen-aged son was dying), the Council issued a formal summons for him:You are required to...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Dec 2017

Visions of “Piers Plowman” in the 18th Century

The best thing about having a Robin Hood theme for this blog is that it allows me to legitimately write about both crime and medievalism (medievalism, as opposed to medieval studies, examines how the medieval period has been represented by authors, artists,...

“To prosecute the Printer at Common Law”?

Yesterday I quoted the essay published in the 14 Nov 1771 Massachusetts Spy over the signature “Mucius Scævola.” It attacked Thomas Hutchinson, declaring him to be an illegitimate governor.(On what grounds? Mostly because Hutchinson...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Dec 2017

A London Lad on the “Edenton ladies”

James Iredell (1751-1799, shown here) moved from England to America in 1767 in search of better prospects. Through family connections he got an office in the Customs service at the small port of Edenton, North Carolina. He also studied the law under Samuel...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Dec 2017

December 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Massachusetts Gazette (December 4, 1767).“At his Shop between LIBERTY TREE and the Sign of the White Horse.” During the era of the American Revolution, advertised had...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Dec 2017

How Long Have Facts Been Stubborn Things?

On 4 December 1770, John Adams wound up his speech in defense of the soldiers tried for murder after the Boston Massacre by saying: I will enlarge no more on the evidence, but submit it to you.—Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Dec 2017

A Philosophical Explosion

Glass drops demonstration in slow motion Previously, we started a tour through Europe that followed the introduction of an item called a "glass drop,"  "Prince Rupert's drop" or "Dutch tear." [1] Today we will explore the attempt of an enlightenment...
From: Conciatore on 4 Dec 2017

The “Farmer” Starts to Speak 250 Years Ago

On 30 Nov 1767, two and a half centuries ago today, the Pennsylvania Chronicle and Universal Advertiser began to publish the series of essays signed “A Farmer.”Those essays were quickly picked up by other printers, first in Philadelphia and...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Nov 2017

Gunpowder, Peine forte et dure, and Medieval Penance

Posted by Sara M. Butler, 21 November 2017. During much of October, newspapers and twitter feeds across the UK were abuzz with news of the miniseries Gunpowder’s graphic depiction of death by peine forte et dure (“strong and hard punishment”)....
From: Legal History Miscellany on 21 Nov 2017

Give us our Daily Bread

Bread, a staple of part of the diet today as much as it was in the Georgian era. Hardly something controversial or so you would think. Kitchen Interior with Still Life by Samuel Smith; Bury Art MuseumIn 1757 the weight of a penny loaf was set to reflect...
From: All Things Georgian on 21 Nov 2017

A Letter on London Politics

Edward Griffin Porter’s Rambles in Old Boston (1886) quotes this letter sent to the private teacher John Leach in Boston. It offers a glimpse of radical politicians in London and of the Boston Whigs’ attempts to make common cause with...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Nov 2017

A Voice from Nantucket

For the last couple of days I’ve quoted newspaper accounts from October 1738 about a violent uprising of Wampanoag people on Nantucket that not only never happened but was, contrary to the first reports, never even planned. In the winter 1996 issue...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Nov 2017

Forest Spirits and Dull Stories: Toleration as Governing Emotion in Seventeenth-Century Finland

By Raisa Maria Toivo, University of Tampere In 1675, a church visitation was held at Kesälahti, a parish located in the county of Kexholm at the eastern border of Finland, which had been annexed to Sweden from Russia in 1618 and had set the stage...
From: Histories of Emotion on 3 Nov 2017

Charles Paxton, Customs Commissioner

Charles Paxton (1708-1788, shown here in a portrait at the American Antiquarian Society) was a major figure in Boston’s 1767 Pope Night procession.Not as a member of the North End or South End Gangs, to be sure. Paxton was the target of those processions,...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Nov 2017

“Then let Adams be sung by each patriot tongue”

Today is John Adams’s birthday (under the Gregorian Calendar, as he observed most of his life). In his honor, here are the lyrics that Jonathan Mitchell Sewall (1748-1808) wrote in President Adams’s honor in 1798. Sewall followed the tune...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Oct 2017

New England's 1656 Witch Trial

History of Witches and Wizards, 1720Trials for witchcraft in New England did not begin in 1692.  In The Salem Witch Trials: a Reference Guide by K. David Goss, he recounts the trial of Anne Hibbins who was hanged in 1656. Anne Hibbins (1656) was...
From: 17th-century American Women on 30 Oct 2017

A Glimpse of the Radical Cotmuir Folk in the Poll Tax of the 1690s #History #Scotland

The Cotmuir Folk are an obscure but radical group influenced by women and prophetic revelations that were based in Dalmeny parish who produced Smoaking Flax Unquenchable (1706), a wonderful, little read and deeply radical anti-Union of 1707 tract. In...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 29 Oct 2017

The Radical Women of the Cotmuir Folk near Edinburgh in 1710 #History #Scotland

The Cotmuir Folk, aka. The Folk, were a small and extremely radical sect that had emerged out of the United Societies after the Revolution of 1689-1690. What marked the Cotmuir Folk out was that women were influential in them. The were based at Cotmuir...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 28 Oct 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.