The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Massachusetts Historical Society"

Your search for posts with tags containing Massachusetts Historical Society found 19 posts

July

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston-Gazette (July 20, 1767). Courtesy Massachusetts Historical Society. View the advertisement and the rest of the newspaper via The Annotated Newspapers of Harbottle Dorr, Jr.“Just...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 20 Jul 2017

Fashioning the New England Family, Massachusetts Historical Society

MassFashion: Fashioning the New England Family Massachusetts Historical Society October 2018 – March 2019 I am delighted to announce that I am serving as the Guest Curator for ‘Fashioning the New England Family’ which will be on view...
From: SilkDamask on 8 May 2017

Rachel Hartwell's Belle Époque Evening Dress

This frothy, feminine 1890s Belle Époque evening dress was worn by Rachel Hartwell (Pfeiffer). According to a family note, included with the dress, it was purchased with money she earned from teaching school. It is in the Hartwell Clark collection...
From: SilkDamask on 18 Dec 2016

A Pocketbook For Benjamin Stuart, 1763

This vibrant crewel pocketbook was made for Benjamin Stuart of Boston and is dated 1763. It is held in the collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society (http://www.masshist.org). The pocketbook features a brightly hued pastoral view with vining...
From: SilkDamask on 20 Sep 2016

An Exceptional Embroidered Silk Waistcoat Worn by Lt. Gov. William Tailer, 1720s-1730s

Lieutenant Governor William Tailer’s Embroidered Silk Waistcoat (by 1730) As part of my research fellowship at the Massachussetts Historical Society, I spent time examining two waistcoats in the collection – one owned by Andrew Oliver and...
From: SilkDamask on 17 Aug 2016

A Victorian Favorite: Special Occasion Shoes by Viault-Este, Paris

Such pretties -- a wedding shoe and a dancing slipper of silk, satin, ribbons, lace, and leather, c. 1860. They were manufactured by Viault-Este, a prolific mid-19th century French shoe concern.  Note the wear marks on the footbed. They joined...
From: SilkDamask on 12 Aug 2016

John Hancock's Table: Turtles, Pineapples and the Paradoxical Politics of 1768

You will always find items both useful and intriguing at the Massachusetts Historical Society (www.masshistory.org). One tasty tidbit, from the Hancock family papers, is a bill of sale dated 27 June 1768, from Oliver Wendell of Boston to John Hancock....
From: SilkDamask on 23 Aug 2015

You Say You Want a Revolution

Building on the commentary about the "So Sudden an Alteration" conference, Joseph Adelman argues that we need to more closely examine what we mean when was talk about the "American Revolution."
From: The Junto on 15 Apr 2015

Live Coverage of So Sudden an Alteration

As you know from last week’s posts by Michael and Ken, this weekend is the second major conference in two years on the American Revolution, So Sudden an Alteration, hosted by the Massachusetts Historical Society.  There have already been a...
From: The Junto on 11 Apr 2015

No Politics, No Revolution

Ken Owen argues that if early American historians are going to get out of their rut, they need to pay more attention to the periodization, the causes, and above all, the politics of the American Revolution.
From: The Junto on 7 Apr 2015

Have Cultural Historians Lost the American Revolution?

Michael D. Hattem ruminates on the state of studies of the American Revolution leading up to the upcoming conference at the Massachusetts Historical Society in April.
From: The Junto on 31 Mar 2015

One Woman’s War

As part of the World War I centennial commemorations which are slowly taking shape in the US and in full flight over there in Europe, the Massachusetts Historical Society has assembled an exhibition entitled Letters and Photographs from the Battle Country:...
From: streets of salem on 8 Oct 2014

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.