The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Motives for Sailing to America"

Showing 1 - 20 of 22

Your search for posts with tags containing Motives for Sailing to America found 22 posts

Over There - Puritans & The Divine Right of Kings

"A Trew Law of Free Monarchs"  James I Stuart   The "Divine Right of Kings." James I. (1566-1625) King of Scotland (as James VI., 1567-1625) First Stuart King of England (as James I., 1603-1625)This oppressive political theory contributed...
From: 17th-century American Women on 29 Aug 2017

Advertising Tobacco Over There -1577

1577 Of the Tabaco and of His Greate Vertues The earliest known image of a man smoking, from Tabaco by Anthony Chute. 1590s. Chute was an Elizabethan poet and pamphleteer.  Text from John Frampton's translation of Nicholas Monardes. It was published...
From: 17th-century American Women on 9 Aug 2017

Quakers in America 17C-18C

Hugh Barbour and J. William Frost, The Quakers (1988). History.com  The Society of Friends, or Quakers, began at the tail end of Europe’s Protestant Reformation in the 17th century. The missionary efforts of the earliest Friends took them to North...
From: 17th-century American Women on 29 Oct 2014

Fleeing to America - Jews & their early settlements

.For some decades Jews had flourished in Dutch-held areas of Brazil; but a Portuguese conquest of the area in 1654, confronted them with the prospect of the Inquisition, which had already burned a Brazilian Jew at the stake in 1647.  A shipload of...
From: 17th-century American Women on 5 Jul 2014

Persecution in America - Quaker Martyr Mary Barrett Dyer c 1612-1660 Hanged in Massachusetts

. Mary Barrett Dyer, born in England, challenged the religious persecution of Quakers in the American colonies. She and her husband, William Dyer, emigrated to Massachusetts in 1635, just 2 years after they married in London.  She sympathized...
From: 17th-century American Women on 11 Aug 2013

Fleeing to America - Catholics to Maryland

.Although the Stuart kings of England did not hate the Roman Catholic Church, most of their subjects did, causing Catholics to be harassed and persecuted in England throughout the seventeenth century. Driven by "the sacred duty of finding a refuge for...
From: 17th-century American Women on 10 Aug 2013

Fleeing to America - Quakers

Early Quaker Meeting where men & women + dogs & cats are not separated.The Quakers (or Religious Society of Friends) formed in England in 1652 around a charismatic leader, George Fox (1624-1691). George Fox (1624-1691) wrote a letter...
From: 17th-century American Women on 9 Aug 2013

Fleeing European Persecution - 17th-Century America as a Religious Refuge

.America as a Religious RefugeMany of the British North American colonies that eventually formed the United States of America were settled in the seventeenth century by men and women, who, in the face of European persecution, refused to compromise passionately...
From: 17th-century American Women on 8 Aug 2013

European Persecution - Mennonites

.Murder of David van der Leyen and Levina Ghyselins, Ghent, 1554Engraving by J. Luyken, from T. J. V. Bracht (or Thieleman van Braght), Het Bloedig Tooneel De Martelaers Spiegel...Amsterdam: J. van der Deyster, et al., 1685. Rare Book and Special Collections...
From: 17th-century American Women on 7 Aug 2013

European Persecutiion - Lutherans

.Lutherans leaving Salzburg, 1731. Engraving by David Böecklin from Die Freundliche Bewillkommung Leipzig: 1732. Rare Books Division. The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden FoundationsThe Expulsion of Lutherans, the SalzburgersOn October...
From: 17th-century American Women on 6 Aug 2013

European Persecution - Jesuits

.John Ogilvie (Ogilby), Societas Jesu, 1615Engraving from Mathias Tanner, Societas Jesu usque ad sanguinis et vitae profusionem Militans...Prague: Typis Universitatis Carolo-Ferdinandeae, 1675Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library of CongressA...
From: 17th-century American Women on 5 Aug 2013

European Persecution - Protestant John Rogers by England's Catholic Queen Mary

.The Burning of Master John Rogers. Engraving from John Fox, The Third Volume of the Ecclesiastical History containing the Acts and Monuments of Martyrs...London: Company of Stationers, 9th edition, 1684. Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library...
From: 17th-century American Women on 4 Aug 2013

European Persecution - Jesuits by English Protestants

.Persecution of Jesuits in EnglandIn the image above is Brian Cansfield (1581-1643), a Jesuit priest seized while at prayer by English Protestant authorities in Yorkshire. Cansfield was beaten and imprisoned under harsh conditions. He died on August 3,...
From: 17th-century American Women on 3 Aug 2013

Why sail for America? Persecution - German & Polish Schwenkfelders

The first group of Germans to settle in Pennsylvania arrived in Philadelphia in 1683, from Krefeld, Germany, and included Mennonites and possibly some Dutch Quakers. During the early years of German emigration to Pennsylvania, most of the emigrants were...
From: 17th-century American Women on 28 Jul 2013

Why Sail for America? Persecution - Hugenots by Catholics

.Massacre Fait a Sens en Bourgogne par la Populace au Mois d'Avril 1562 . . .Lithograph in A. Challe, Histoire des Guerres du Calvinisme et de la Ligue dans l'Auxerrois, le Sénonais et le autres contrées qui forment aujourd'hui le département de l'Yonne...
From: 17th-century American Women on 27 Jul 2013

Why sail for America? Persecution - Irish Protestants by Catholics

Massacre of the Protestant Martyrs at the Bridge over the River Bann in Ireland, 1641. Engraving from Matthew Taylor, England's Bloody Tribunal: Or, Popish Cruelty Displayed ...London: J. Cooke, 1772. Rare Book and Special Collections Division, Library...
From: 17th-century American Women on 26 Jul 2013

Why sail for America? Persecution - Catholics by Hugenots

.Frightful Outrages perpetrated by the Huguenots in France. Engraving from Richard Verstegen, Théâtre des Cruautez des Hérétiques de notre temps Antwerp: Adrien Hubert, 1607.Persecution of Catholics by HuguenotsHuguenots became known for their harsh...
From: 17th-century American Women on 25 Jul 2013

Why sail for America? Persecution - German Dunkers, New Baptists, Brethern

The first group of Germans to settle in Pennsylvania arrived in Philadelphia in 1683 from Krefeld, Germany, and included Mennonites and possibly some Dutch Quakers. During the early years of German emigration to Pennsylvania, most of the emigrants were...
From: 17th-century American Women on 24 Jul 2013

Why sail for America? - Persecution - Puritans

.Puritans were English Protestants who wished to reform and purify the Church of England of what they considered to be unacceptable residues of Roman Catholicism. In the 1620s leaders of the English state and church grew increasingly unsympathetic to...
From: 17th-century American Women on 23 Jul 2013

Why sail for America? - German Mennonites, Dunkers, Schwenkfelders, Moravians, Quakers, & Baptists

The first group of Germans to settle in Pennsylvania arrived in Philadelphia in 1683 from Krefeld, Germany, and included Mennonites and possibly some Dutch Quakers. During the early years of German emigration to Pennsylvania, most of the emigrants were...
From: 17th-century American Women on 22 Jul 2013

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