The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Primary Sources"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Primary Sources found 87 posts

1629 The Native Americans in early New England

A Short and True Description of New Englandby the Rev. Francis Higginson, written in 1629  Printed for Michael Sparke, London, 1630.Francis Higginson (1588-1630) was an early Puritan minister in Colonial New England, and the first minister of Salem,...
From: 17th-century American Women on 5 Jul 2013

1629 Food in early New England

A Short and True Description of New Englandby the Rev. Francis Higginson, written in 1629  Printed for Michael Sparke, London, 1630.Francis Higginson (1588-1630) was an early Puritan minister in Colonial New England, and the first minister of Salem,...
From: 17th-century American Women on 1 Jul 2013

Good News from New England - Journal of sailing to 1624 Plymouth

Good News from New England - Journal of events at Plymouth Colony between 1622 & 1623 . Chapter 8, Thinking about Sailing to New England? Written by Mayflower passenger Edward Winslow,  & published in London in 1624.  ...
From: 17th-century American Women on 9 Dec 2017

1622 Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth from Landing to the 1st Thanksgiving

Mourt's Relation: A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth, 1622, (Part I From Landing to Thanksgiving) Edited by Caleb Johnson based on a fasimilie edition of the original 1622 edition, updated the spelling to modern American-English standards. Mourt's...
From: 17th-century American Women on 7 Dec 2017

Washington’s Encampment at Verplanck 178

Having recently visited the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia and written about it in this post, I am tempted to return to see a special limited-run exhibit there from January 13 to February 19. On display will be a newly discovered seven-foot-long...
From: In the Words of Women on 5 Dec 2017

Food Eaten by Early Plymouth Colonists for to Give Thanks

References to the 1621 Plymouth  Thanksgiving celebration: “And God be praised we had a good increase… Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together after...
From: 17th-century American Women on 23 Aug 2017

“Goods & Chattles”

An inventory of a household’s goods provides an intimate glimpse of the owner’s life as no other document can. Reading it, one almost feels guilty of spying or trespassing. ELIZABETH AMSDEN (1724-1768), an unmarried woman from Deerfield, Massachusetts,...
From: In the Words of Women on 27 Nov 2017

“Ye Olde English Tea Shoppe”

More about deciphering eighteenth century handwriting. Readers will, of course, have seen the sign “Ye Olde English Tea Shoppe” when looking for a place to have a cuppa. The “y” in the sign is a thorn and represents “th”;...
From: In the Words of Women on 16 Nov 2017

Lascivious Conduct - 1637-1686 in the Plymouth Colony Court Records

Lascivious ConductAugust 21, 1637. John Bundy was ex[amined] & found guilty of lude behavior [&] vnciuill carriage towards Elizabeth Haybell, in the house of her m[aster], Mr. William Brewster, & is therefore adjudged to be seuerely whiped,...
From: 17th-century American Women on 10 Jul 2013

Sodomy - 1637-1642 in the Plymouth Colony Court Records

SodomyAugust 6, 1637.  John Allexander & Thomas Roberts were both ex ned and found guilty of lude behavior and uncleane carriage one w/ another, by often spendinge their seede one vpon another, w[hich] was proued both by witnesse &...
From: 17th-century American Women on 2 Jul 2013

Buggery - 1642-1681 in the Plymouth Colony Court Records

BuggerySeptember 7, 1642  Thomas Graunger, late servant to Loue Brewster, of Duxborrow, was this Court indicted for buggery with a mare, a cowe, two goats, diuers sheepe, two calues, & a turkey, & was found guilty, & receiued sentence...
From: 17th-century American Women on 4 Jul 2013

Adultery - 1639-1678 in the Plymouth Colony Court Records

AdulterySeptember 3, 1639 Mary, the wyfe of Robert Mendame, of Duxborrow, for using dallyance diuers tymes with Tinsin, an Indian, & after committing the act of vncleanesse with him, as by his owne confession by seuerall interpreters is made apparent,...
From: 17th-century American Women on 30 Jun 2013

Witches - A Condemned 1692 Salem Witch & Her Husband Speak Out

.Ulrich Molitor. De Lamiis et Phitonicis Mulieribus, 1493 Mary Towne Easty, the daughter of William Towne & Joanna Blessing Towne of Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England, was baptized on August 24, 1634. One of 8 children, she & her family sailed...
From: 17th-century American Women on 9 Oct 2013

New England's 1656 Witch Trial

History of Witches and Wizards, 1720Trials for witchcraft in New England did not begin in 1692.  In The Salem Witch Trials: a Reference Guide by K. David Goss, he recounts the trial of Anne Hibbins who was hanged in 1656. Anne Hibbins (1656) was...
From: 17th-century American Women on 30 Oct 2017

Fornication - 1633-86 in the Plymouth Colony Court Records

FornicationApril 1, 1633 It. John Hews [&] Jone his wife adjudged to sitt in the stocks because the said Jone conceived w[ith] childe by him before they were publickely married, though in the time of contract.April 1, 1633 It. John Thorp [&] Alice...
From: 17th-century American Women on 8 Jul 2013

Witches - Cotton Mather on Witches 1689

In 1692, at the Salem Village in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, Sarah Goode, Sarah Osborne, & Tituba, an Indian slave from Barbados, were charged with the illegal practice of witchcraft. Later that day, Tituba, possibly under coercion, confessed to...
From: 17th-century American Women on 10 Oct 2013

A Short Break

For the next few days I will be visiting the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia. It opened in April and I am anxious to see what steps have been taken to make the period more meaningful and accessible to young and old alike. I’m interested,...
From: In the Words of Women on 24 Oct 2017

Witches - Timeline of the 1692 Salem's Anti-Woman Witch Hunt

.During 1692, formal charges of witchcraft were brought against 156 people & most were women. On both sides of the Atlantic, witchcraft was perceived as a primarily female phenomenon & over ¾ of the accused were women. Puritans did not believe...
From: 17th-century American Women on 11 Oct 2013

Miscellaneous Sexual Offences - 1653-1683 in the Plymouth Colony Court Records

Miscellaneous Sexual OffencesJune 9, 1653 An order was likewise passed from the Court requiring that Teag Jones & Richard Berry, & others with them, bee caused to part theire vnciuell liueing together, as they will answare it.May 1, 1660 Att this...
From: 17th-century American Women on 6 Jul 2013

Rape - 1677 & 1682 in the Plymouth Colony Court Records

RapeOctober 30, 1677  Att this Court, Ambrose Fish was inditied by the name of Ambrose Fish, for that hee, haueing not the feare of God before his eyes, did wickedly, and contrary to the order of nature, on the tweluth day of July last past before...
From: 17th-century American Women on 28 Jun 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.