The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Religion"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Religion found 644 posts

Boston in 1774 with Notes from Later

Cortney Skinner alerted me to this item in the New York Public Library’s digital images collection.It’s a leaf from Isaiah Thomas’s Royal American Magazine in early 1774 that featured Paul Revere’s engraving of the eastern shore...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Dec 2017

The Thanksgiving Proclamation at Old South

The controversy over Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s Thanksgiving proclamation in 1771 caused particular trouble in Boston’s largest meetinghouse, the Old South. That church had not had a placid year. In 1769 its minister, the Rev. Samuel Blair,...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Nov 2017

The Proclamation “read in our churches last Sunday”?

The Rev. Dr. Samuel Cooper no doubt had an inside view of the Boston Whigs’ efforts to organize political resistance to Gov. Thomas Hutchinson and his 1771 Thanksgiving proclamation.Indeed, Cooper was probably one of the Boston ministers who came...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Nov 2017

From Freedom of the Press to St Elizabeth Seaton - The complicated life of Elizabeth Becker Curson 1731-1787

1757 Thomas McIlworth (fl 1757-67). Elizabeth Becker (Mrs. Richard Curzon or Curson) 1731-1787.  Elizabeth Rebecca Becker was born into a family of strong women, but she certainly was not born into elite colonial society. Elizabeth Becker was born...
From: 18th-century American Women on 28 Nov 2017

The Governor’s Thanksgiving Proclamation as a “solemn mockery”

By law, Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s Thanksgiving proclamation for 1771 was supposed to be read out by the ministers of all the meetinghouses in Massachusetts.That’s why the colony commissioned Richard Draper to print the proclamation in broadside....
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Nov 2017

Why the 1771 Thanksgiving Proclamation Was “Offensive”

So why were Boston’s Whigs so upset about Gov. Thomas Hutchinson’s Thanksgiving proclamation for 1771? What was their problem with the phrase about thanking God for having ”continue[d] to them their civil and religious Privileges”?For...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Nov 2017

“They could not join in giving thanks”

Yesterday I shared the 1771 Thanksgiving proclamation issued by Gov. Thomas Hutchinson (shown here). It quickly became a source of controversy.Why? In his role as historian, Hutchinson presented his side of the story this way:It had been a long, uninterrupted...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Nov 2017

“A Day of Publick Thanksgiving” in 1771

By tradition, the royal governor of Massachusetts proclaimed a day of Thanksgiving in the province every autumn, usually in late November or early December.(Governors sometimes also proclaimed Thanksgivings in response to military challenges or triumphs,...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Nov 2017

Erasmus on the Arts in Luther’s Reformation: A Tragedy

By Kirk Essary, The University of Western Australia The arts had affective import for Erasmus on multiple levels. The emotions themselves are described by the Dutch humanist in categories derived from the ars rhetorica, and according to the genres of...
From: Histories of Emotion on 10 Nov 2017

Forest Spirits and Dull Stories: Toleration as Governing Emotion in Seventeenth-Century Finland

By Raisa Maria Toivo, University of Tampere In 1675, a church visitation was held at Kesälahti, a parish located in the county of Kexholm at the eastern border of Finland, which had been annexed to Sweden from Russia in 1618 and had set the stage...
From: Histories of Emotion on 3 Nov 2017

Luther and England’s Long Reformation

Today is the 500th anniversary of an event that may never have happened, but which may as well have. Sometimes, what really matters in history is not what really happened, but what people have said about it. This is true in my own area of interest, the...
From: wartsandbrawls on 31 Oct 2017

New England's 1656 Witch Trial

History of Witches and Wizards, 1720Trials for witchcraft in New England did not begin in 1692.  In The Salem Witch Trials: a Reference Guide by K. David Goss, he recounts the trial of Anne Hibbins who was hanged in 1656. Anne Hibbins (1656) was...
From: 17th-century American Women on 30 Oct 2017

CFP: Historians of Women Religious of Britain and Ireland Annual Conference

The Historians of Women Religious of Britain and Ireland network is a lively community of scholars that includes academics, archivists, students and others interested in the history of women religious from medieval to modern times. The network hosts an...
From: RECIRC on 30 Oct 2017

“Religious Spaces” at the 2018 Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife

Next year’s Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife will take place on 22-24 June 2018 at Historic Deerfield. The subject will be “Religious Spaces: Our Vanishing Landmarks.”Here’s the call for papers and similar material in that...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Oct 2017

Le Portugal de Voltaire: un royaume sans lumières

Honoré Daumier, jésuite cherchant à détériorer la statue de Voltaire. Lithographie parue dans Le Charivari du 22 septembre 1869. Voltaire a très tôt développé une piètre opinion...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 24 Oct 2017

Guest Post: George Washington’s Mausoleum: Congressional Debates Over the Work of Monuments

In light of recent debates over monuments, guest poster Jamie L. Brummitt explores the politics of monuments in the early republic.
From: The Junto on 16 Oct 2017

Genealogies of Revolutionary Iconoclasm, from Tupac Amaru to Central Park, Pt I

By Ananda Cohen-Aponte Rebellions, insurgencies, uprisings, and revolutions all involve the radical uprooting of the normative social order through violent conflict. They also bring the promise of new beginnings, cultivated through the spread of liberatory...
From: Age of Revolutions on 9 Oct 2017

Graduate Student Conference at the Newberry Library

The Center for Renaissance Studies will be holding its annual Graduate Student Conference at the Newberry Library in January 2018. Graduate students in medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies are encouraged to submit a proposal for this conference....

Providence College’s Seminar on the History of Early America

The Department of History & Classics at Providence College in Rhode Island is launching a Seminar on the History of Early America.Participants in these sessions “will discuss pre-circulated works in progress, including chapters of doctoral dissertations,...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Oct 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.