The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Religion"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Religion found 628 posts

Guest Post: George Washington’s Mausoleum: Congressional Debates Over the Work of Monuments

In light of recent debates over monuments, guest poster Jamie L. Brummitt explores the politics of monuments in the early republic.
From: The Junto on 16 Oct 2017

Genealogies of Revolutionary Iconoclasm, from Tupac Amaru to Central Park, Pt I

By Ananda Cohen-Aponte Rebellions, insurgencies, uprisings, and revolutions all involve the radical uprooting of the normative social order through violent conflict. They also bring the promise of new beginnings, cultivated through the spread of liberatory...
From: Age of Revolutions on 9 Oct 2017

Graduate Student Conference at the Newberry Library

The Center for Renaissance Studies will be holding its annual Graduate Student Conference at the Newberry Library in January 2018. Graduate students in medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies are encouraged to submit a proposal for this conference....

Providence College’s Seminar on the History of Early America

The Department of History & Classics at Providence College in Rhode Island is launching a Seminar on the History of Early America.Participants in these sessions “will discuss pre-circulated works in progress, including chapters of doctoral dissertations,...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Oct 2017

Philadelphia Programs in October

A couple of intriguing academic conferences are happening in Philadelphia this month. I’m sharing links to the programs for people who are in the area and those interested in current scholarship.The McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Oct 2017

The Politics of Conversion: Martin Luther to Muhammad Ali

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library hosted a major conference on The Politics of Conversion: Martin Luther to Muhammad Ali last week. I enjoyed participating in the conference and presenting a paper on “Conversion, Confessional...

"Something Like Summer": Movie review

In 2011, American author Jay Bell released the first novel in what subsequently became a self-published phenomenon, winning fans across the world. Something Like Summer, covering twelve years in the life of Texan high school student Benjamin Bentley,...
From: Confessions of a Ci-Devant on 22 Sep 2017

Les Nouveaux Mélanges : recette d’une bonne capilotade, façon Voltaire

CAPILOTADE. s. f. Sorte de ragoût fait de plusieurs morceaux de viandes déjà cuites. Bonne capilotade. Faire une capilotade des restes de perdrix, de poulets. On dit proverbialement et figurément, Mettre quelqu’un...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 19 Sep 2017

“Mr. Cleaveland’s moral, Christian and ministerial character”

Yesterday we left the Rev. John Cleaveland, Jr., at odds with his Stoneham neighbors in 1794. The trouble was his second marriage to young Elizabeth Evans, until recently his housekeeper and apparently not even a dedicated member of the church.As the...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Sep 2017

The Difficult Career of the Rev. John Cleaveland, Jr.

John Cleaveland was born in the part of Ipswich that’s now Essex in 1750. He was the son and namesake of the town minister.John, Jr., apparently grew up expecting to study at Yale, where his father had graduated five years before his birth. But...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Sep 2017

The Emotional Nature of Belief in Demons

By Juanita Feros Ruys, The University of Sydney One of the most interesting aspects of the intellectual history of the Middle Ages is the question of epistemology: how people ‘knew’ things. This is a particularly pertinent question when, as...
From: Histories of Emotion on 8 Sep 2017

Fleeing to America - Jews & their early settlements

.For some decades Jews had flourished in Dutch-held areas of Brazil; but a Portuguese conquest of the area in 1654, confronted them with the prospect of the Inquisition, which had already burned a Brazilian Jew at the stake in 1647.  A shipload of...
From: 17th-century American Women on 5 Jul 2014

The Dangerous Quaker Lady Deborah Moody - Only Women to Found a Colony on the Atlantic Coast

Lady Deborah Moody (1586-1659), founder of a colony on Long Island, was born at Avebury in Wiltshire County, England. Her parents, Walter Dunch and Deborah, daughter of James Pilkington, Bishop of Durham, who had been a radical Protestant in the time...
From: 17th-century American Women on 31 Aug 2017

Over There - Puritans & The Divine Right of Kings

"A Trew Law of Free Monarchs"  James I Stuart   The "Divine Right of Kings." James I. (1566-1625) King of Scotland (as James VI., 1567-1625) First Stuart King of England (as James I., 1603-1625)This oppressive political theory contributed...
From: 17th-century American Women on 29 Aug 2017

“The Government of this Colledge is very Strict”

Yesterday I quoted the start of John Adams’s description of his first visit to Princeton in August 1774, when he was on his way to the First Continental Congress. Adams viewed the college’s Nassau Hall, the mansion of Judge Richard Stockton,...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Aug 2017

August 27

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Journal (August 27, 1767).“The Subscribers are desired to send for ther Books as soon as possible.” In 1767 Lambertus de Ronde, “Minister of the Protestant...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 Aug 2017

Thomas Coram and a Symposium in Greenwich

On 30 October there will be a symposium in London on “Art, Charity & the Navy: The Greenwich & Foundling Hospitals.” This event is hosted and co-sponsored by the Foundling Hospital and Royal Museums Greenwich with its Queen’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Aug 2017

The Legal Realities of the Touro Synagogue

This month the U.S. Circuit Court in Boston decided which congregation owned the historic Touro Synagogue in Newport, Rhode Island, and (the crux of the case) the eighteenth-century rimonim that silversmith Myer Myers made to adorn its Torah scrolls....
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Aug 2017

Anglicans in 17C Virginia

Virginia was settled by businessmen--operating through a joint-stock company, the Virginia Company of London--who wanted to get rich.They also wanted the Church to flourish in their colony and kept it well supplied with ministers. Some early governors...
From: 17th-century American Women on 21 Aug 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.