The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing Research found 1174 posts

How to Start Your Thesis

Jerry Bannister Starting a graduate thesis is hard. Anyone who tells you otherwise is lying, delusional, or one of those bizarre people who find it easy. December in Canada brings awful holiday specials on TV, complaints about freezing rain and, for those...
From: Borealia on 11 Dec 2017

Archive work in the British Library – the way I work

At the end of September I went down to London to hear a paper by Chris Marsh at the Royal Historical Society, so I took the opportunity to travel down a bit ahead of time and spend the afternoon in the British Library.  This is something I haven’t...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 1 Dec 2017

The Offpeak Day Return of the King

A bit of an oddity for this week’s second blog. (And anybody thinking ‘the blogger’s a bit of an oddity anyway’ is toast.) Last week’s trip to Galloway – see the previous post – provided me with lots of inspiration...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 30 Nov 2017

Inspiration Roundtable: Haunting Sources

Today, Lindsay O’Neill, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Southern California, joins our weeklong discussion about sources and inspiration. Her first book, The Opened Letter: Networking in the Early Modern British World, was published...
From: The Junto on 29 Nov 2017

Inspiration Roundtable: Guest Post by Whitney Barlow Robles, “Naturalist in Historian’s Clothing”

This week at the Junto we are stepping back to talk about what inspired our research projects. From dissertations to first and second book projects, we will bring together a range of scholars to discuss the method, source, book, or lecture that got them...
From: The Junto on 27 Nov 2017

South Australian researchers use 3D technology to uncover secrets of 17th and 18th century model ships

A replica of the 17th century Dutch trading ship the Batavia. Picture: Chris Pavlich. http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/south-australian-researchers-use-3d-technology-to-uncover-secrets-of-17th-and-18th-century-model-ships/news-story/87289f91755c5ae413269c796256a743
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 25 Nov 2017

The way we work

I was   I was fascinated by this series of posts on Twitter by Bradley Irish…  It’s true, I think.  I was reminded of some interviews done by the Marine Lives project last year which looked at the way historians carry out research...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 23 Nov 2017

My journey towards knotty history with the Recipes Project – reflections of a medical herbalist

by Anne Stobart Starting from a science background ‘That is bad history!’ scowled my history lecturer back a decade or so. Yikes, what could I have done wrong? I felt struck down, so ashamed to have committed some major error, even deserving...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Nov 2017

National Museum of the American Indian. A Link.

 Joseph Brant, by Gore Romney My thanks to my friend Swampfox for supplying this link. Thanks mate.Keith.http://www.nmai.si.edu/searchcollections/peoplescultures.aspx
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 22 Nov 2017

Updates from the Hearth Tax Centre

As 2017 draws to a close, there have been a number of exciting changes here at the Hearth Tax Centre. New Research Officer We have welcomed Charlie Berry to the Centre as Research Officer, taking over from John Price who moved on earlier this year. Alongside...
From: Hearth Tax Online on 21 Nov 2017

No, Confederation Wasn’t About ‘Freedom’

Shirley Tillotson Editors’ note: This essay is jointly posted with our partners at ActiveHistory.ca, and appeared in an earlier version as a Letter to the Editor in the National Post (Oct. 26, 2017). Fundraisers love anniversaries. They’re...
From: Borealia on 14 Nov 2017

Enter Miranda: the Folger’s new digital platform

“Admired Miranda! Indeed the top of admiration, worth What’s dearest to the world!” William Shakespeare’s The Tempest (3.1.47-50) Miranda’s home page offers a chance to search by format, genre, date ranges, or language.The...
From: The Collation on 2 Nov 2017

What I've Learned About the 1830s in 2.75 Days

Dress, c. 1835 - FIDM Though I have less and less time to devote to making historical costumes these days (ironically, but such is running two footwear companies), I still love a good dive down a rabbit hole. This weekend past was spent pouring over any...

Fake views: an unusual false attribution

While looking for a pamphlet entitled Lettre de M. de B… à Monsieur de Voltaire I came across a Lettre de M. de Voltaire au peuple d’Angleterre, sur les écarts qu’il a fait paraître, au sujet des balladins français....
From: Voltaire Foundation on 31 Oct 2017

Did Hamilton Write Too Much For His Own Good?

Hamilton wrote … the other FIFTY-ONE! You probably know that line about the Federalist from the Act One finale of Hamilton, “Non-Stop,” in which Aaron Burr repeatedly asks Hamilton, “how do you write like you’re running...
From: The Junto on 24 Oct 2017

Britishness and Whiteness in Early Canadian Culture

Oana Godeanu-Kenworthy In the September 28, 2017 issue of the New York Review of Books, Fintan O’Toole explained Brexit as the consequence of a rebirth of English nationalism: “Brexit is a peaceful revolution but it is unmistakably a nationalist...
From: Borealia on 23 Oct 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.