The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Shakespeare's World"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Shakespeare's World found 203 posts

Ovid and Shakespeare: the world’s greatest storytellers

Ovid: The Poet and the Emperor Anyone who’s interested in Shakespeare will have heard the name Ovid, but how much do we really know about him? I’ve written a couple of posts on Ovid myself, but I have never really investigated the story of...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 19 Nov 2017

The importance of image: Martin Luther and the 95 Theses

Greg Copeland’s painting of Martin Luther It’s one of the most famous of images: a simply dressed monk takes a hammer and nails, the symbols of the crucifixion of Christ, and fixes a large document to the wooden door of a church. The date...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 31 Oct 2017

Shakespeare: Print and Performance

The 1599 Second Quarto of Romeo and Juliet For many years, even centuries, there was a huge divide between Shakespeare’s plays as they were performed and how they appeared in print. Scholars wrestled with the numerous different editions of the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 16 Oct 2017

Influences on Shakespeare

Chipo Chung as Dido and Sandy Grierson as Aeneas in the RSC’s Dido Queen of Carthage. Photo by Topher McGrillis, copyright RSC The source books from which Shakespeare took the main stories of his plays are well-known, sometimes so important that...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 9 Oct 2017

Fulke Greville, a great Elizabethan

Fulke Greville On 30 September 1628, Fulke Greville died, just days before his 74th birthday. He had lived a remarkable life, that ended dramatically after being stabbed by a servant who supposedly felt cheated after being left out of his master’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 30 Sep 2017

Thomas Nashe and the end of Summer

The poster for Edward’s Boys production of Summer’s Last Will and Testament Now the autumn equinox has passed summer is really over and it’s fitting that the boy players of Shakespeare’s School, Edward’s Boys, are performing...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 22 Sep 2017

Shakespeare’s Warwick

The Beauchamp Chapel, Warwick I recently went on a tour of one of Warwick’s most ancient buildings, the Collegiate Church of St Mary. As we were taken round, our guide pointed out memorials that made me wonder about the impact this town and its...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 19 Sep 2017

Shakespeare and Greenwich

Greenwich Palace in the Tudor period There is something special about the place where important events took place, no matter how long ago. Even where there are no remaining signs on the ground people still visit: perhaps the draw is that these sites...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 1 Sep 2017

Edward’s Boys in summer 2017

A scene from Edward’s Boys production of The Dutch Courtesan I’ve written lots of posts mentioning Edward’s Boys, the brilliant troupe of boys from King Edward VI School in Stratford-upon-Avon who, under the leadership of Deputy Head...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 10 Jul 2017

Before Shakespeare at the Shakespeare Institute

A summer of great events for those interested in Shakespeare and his theatrical background is just getting under way. From 12-30 June 2017 the fifth play-reading marathon will be held at the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon. Up to now, these...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 11 Jun 2017

Shakespeare and St George in Stratford-upon-Avon

14th century Russian icon of St George and the Dragon 23rd April is celebrated as the special day of St George, the patron saint of England. He’s one of the most popular of saints, venerated in Romania,  parts of Greece, Catalonia and Egypt,...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 28 Apr 2017

Shakespeare’s Schooldays brought to life

King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon On Tuesday 4 April I addressed the pupils of King Edward VI School in Stratford-upon-Avon, Shakespeare’s School, at their morning assembly, part of our efforts to publicise the town’s two hundred-year...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 7 Apr 2017

Shakespeare commonplace book on Antiques Roadshow

The seventeenth century commonplace book An inside page of the miniature commonplace book The BBC Antiques Roadshow has often featured items with a Shakespeare connection, but on Sunday 2 April 2017 we saw “one of the most remarkable items to...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 2 Apr 2017

Shakespeare and the destructiveness of fire

Shakespeare uses fire as a metaphor for the energy of life as well as the destructiveness of death. He writes of the fires of purgatory, of the warming fire on the hearth and of the fires lit to tell of victory in war. In his everyday life Shakespeare...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 6 Mar 2017

“The point envenom’d too” onstage fighting or the real thing?

A Victorian staging of the Battle of Bosworth from Richard III On 13 December 2016, the members of Stratford-upon-Avon’s Shakespeare Club will be able to get an inside view on the subject of staging battles and fights in productions of Shakespeare’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 9 Dec 2016

Looking at Paper and Recipes…

By Elaine Leong Earlier this year, when the daffodils were in full bloom, I shared the fruits of my recent research with the readers of this blog. My current project, ‘Papering the Household: Paper, Recipes and Technologies in Early Modern England’...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Aug 2016

Shakespeare’s swans

Over the past few weeks my husband Richard has been keeping an eye on a pair of swans, nesting just downstream of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford-upon-Avon. Stratfordians are quite protective of their swans, not least because of their connection to Shakespeare,...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 28 May 2016

Theatre Before Shakespeare

A few weeks ago a new website launched, the public face of a project run by academics Andy Kesson and Lucy Munro with the aim of “rethinking the start of the public theatre in Britain”, that is “the playhouses that open in and around...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 20 May 2016

Looking at death in Shakespeare’s life and works

Page 2 of Shakespeare’s will This 23rd April we’re marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, and while it’s much more fun to celebrate Shakespeare’s achievement and legacy, some of the events that are happening...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 15 Apr 2016

Documenting Shakespeare

A couple of weeks ago I acquired, from a second hand book dealer, a copy of a book I have long coveted, Samuel Schoenbaum’s William Shakespeare: a Documentary Life. This book was published in 1975 and when I began work at the Shakespeare Centre...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 15 Mar 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.