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Search Results for "Shakespeare Birthplace Trust"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Shakespeare Birthplace Trust found 446 posts

Securing Shakespeare’s Birthplace for the nation and the world

The auction 16 September 1847 16 September 1847 is a date that all those interested in Shakespeare should know. On that date an auction was held at the Auction Mart in London at which Shakespeare’s birthplace, described on the sale poster as “The...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 16 Sep 2017

ANSWERS

ANSWERS By Jillian Snyder Outside and in: St Swithun’s Church, Lower Quinton, Warwickshire. Outside and in: St Swithun’s Church, Lower Quinton, Warwickshire. Jillian Snyder is a Ph.D. student at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, and...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 19 Aug 2017

QUESTIONS

QUESTIONS By Jillian Snyder   Jillian Snyder peering through ‘History Play’ (2001) by Jane Lawrence, in the grounds of Anne Hathaway’s Cottage. Jillian Snyder is a Ph.D. student at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, and was...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 17 Aug 2017

King John in Print and Performance

By Andrew Brown, Yale University. Blog Post 1: King John in Print and Performance Andrew Brown is a Ph.D. student at Yale and was one of the recipients of a Sir Stanley Wells Shakespeare Studentship, via the American Friends of the Shakespeare Birthplace...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 7 Aug 2017

Ithaca in Stratford-upon-Avon: A Tribute to Sir Derek Walcott, Second Instalment of Blog Series

By Miranda Jones, Research Advocate, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust   Although the final script of Derek Walcott’s The Odyssey was published in 1993, a performance of the play has not been made widely available as a recording, and it is less...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 4 Aug 2017

Working on John Hall at The Shakespeare Centre.

By Oscar Lake Herball or Generall Historie of Plantes, 1633.   This following post was written by fifteen-year-old Oscar Lake, who was on a work experience placement with Dr Paul Edmondson, Head of Research. He was based in Library and Archives...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 3 Aug 2017

Marie Corelli: Stratford-upon-Avon’s‘Fairy Queen’?

By Nick Birch Marie Corelli in her conservatory at Mason Croft (now the Shakespeare Institute). She lived there from 1901 until her death in 1924. Photo courtesy of The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust.   In 1899 Marie Corelli, with her companion Bertha...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 1 Aug 2017

Ithaca in Stratford-upon-Avon: A Tribute to Sir Derek Walcott.

By Miranda Jones, Research Advocate, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Derek Walcott In 1991 the Artistic Director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, Adrian Noble, discussed the next potential project for the Stratford-upon-Avon stage with Gregory Doran....
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 25 Jul 2017

Salomé at the Swan

By Drs Sarah-Jane Fenton, Research Fellow, Mental Health & Wellbeing Unit, Warwick Medical School and Anjna Chouhan, Lecturer in Shakespeare Studies, Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. Matthew Tennyson as Salomé. Copyright the RSC....
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 18 Jul 2017

Bram and the Guv’nor: Henry Irving and his manager onstage together

Henry Irving as Hamlet Through his novel Dracula and the numerous adaptations of it, writer Bram Stoker is probably now better known than the man who was his “Guv’nor”, the great late-Victorian actor Henry Irving. The two men had...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 16 May 2017

Shakespeare in the Gallery, Library, Archive and Museum

Fuseli, Henry; Lady Macbeth Seizing the Daggers; Tate; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/lady-macbeth-seizing-the-daggers-198821 Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums, known collectively as GLAMs contain many examples of the way in which...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 7 May 2017

Louis Marder Scholarship 2017

Louis Marder This is a new version of the blog posted earlier and contains an important update. The contact address for applications is SCLA@shakespeare.org.uk. Are you studying Shakespeare at college, university, or for leisure? Are you going to be...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 2 May 2017

Louis Marder Scholarship 2017

Louis Marder Are you studying Shakespeare at college, university, or for leisure? Are you going to be using the archives or library of The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust? If so, you might be interested in applying for the Louis Marder Shakespeare Centre...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 1 May 2017

Shakespeare Birthday Celebrations 2017 in Stratford-upon-Avon

The band at the head of Bridge Street In 2017 I am more aware than ever how lucky I am to live in Stratford-upon-Avon, able to take a full part in the whole weekend of the Birthday Celebrations, not just the day itself. So many events take place...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 23 Apr 2017

Making Shakespeare Brand-new: A Tribute to Michael Bogdanov

Making Shakespeare Brand-new: A Tribute to Michael Bogdanov (15 December 1938 – 16 April 2017)by Paul Edmondson I first met Michael Bogdanov in 2008, when he came to take part in a study day on Hamlet at the Shakespeare Centre. He had directed...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 21 Apr 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.