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Search Results for "Shakespeare Memorial Theatre"

Showing 1 - 20 of 33

Your search for posts with tags containing Shakespeare Memorial Theatre found 33 posts

Robert Hardy and Shakespeare

  Robert Hardy On Thursday 3 August 2017 one of the UK’s best-loved actors, Robert Hardy, died. His family described him as “Gruff, elegant, twinkly, and always dignified” and most of his admirers would agree. I remember him best...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 7 Aug 2017

William Roxby Beverley, a forgotten theatre artist at Stratford-upon-Avon

Photo of the interior of the SMT around 1920 including the drop curtain A couple of weeks ago I was browsing the Stratford-upon-Avon Then and Now Facebook page when I spotted an unusual image posted by David Mills. With nearly 2000 members, this group...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 17 Mar 2017

Elisabeth Scott, architect and pioneer on International Women’s Day

Elisabeth Scott 8 March 2017 is both the UK’s Budget Day and International Women’s Day, when attention is drawn to gender inequality in all fields including education and jobs. In addition, demonstrations will be held at Westminster...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 8 Mar 2017

Shakespeare and the destructiveness of fire

Shakespeare uses fire as a metaphor for the energy of life as well as the destructiveness of death. He writes of the fires of purgatory, of the warming fire on the hearth and of the fires lit to tell of victory in war. In his everyday life Shakespeare...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 6 Mar 2017

Shakespeare memories from the Bush

Jim Morris with his scrapbook A couple of weeks ago I visited my brother-in-law James (Jim) Morris, who has lived on a beautiful plot of forest in New South Wales, Australia, near the small town Eden, for over thirty years. He left Stratford-upon-Avon,...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 30 Jul 2016

A Gift from the Queen

The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust library acquires books though purchases and donations. This series of blogs looks at historic as well as recent book donations that have enriched our library collection. Some date as far back as the nineteenth century...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 22 Mar 2016

Pericles onstage

Wayne T Carr as Pericles, Oregon Shakespeare Festival On 13 November 2015, for the first time since its opening in 1992, Pericles is to be staged at the Folger Theatre in Washington, DC. The production premiered at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 5 Nov 2015

When Parliament almost came to Stratford-upon-Avon

The Palace of Westminster On 18 June 2015 a report was published concerning the need for major restoration on the Houses of Parliament in London. It outlines a number of possible options for the work and for what might happen to Parliament in the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 29 Jun 2015

The Swan Wing takes flight

The Swan Wing of the RST in Stratford Last week the Royal Shakespeare Company announced the start of a major project to restore what is now called the Swan Wing, the most historic part of their complex of buildings. From January work will begin on both...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 8 Dec 2014

Explore Your Archive 2014

  Last week was ‘Explore Your Archive‘ week, a national campaign set up by the National Archives to encourage awareness of archives and what they hold and to enable people to discover the archives in their local area.  We held several...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 20 Nov 2014

Mary Anderson, an American actress abroad

Mary Anderson as Rosalind On the 29th August 1885 a special performance took place at the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre. The famous Mary Anderson and her Company staged As You Like It as a Benefit for the Shakespeare Memorial Fund. Although her name is...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 29 Aug 2014

The pioneering Flowers of Stratford-upon-Avon

Edward Fordham Flower in 1864 Today there are few places where you will see the name of Flower in Stratford-upon-Avon apart from in a pub, but a hundred or even fifty years ago Flowers Brewery was one of the major employers in the town with a large building...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 25 Aug 2014

An Indian Romeo and Juliet

India’s relationship with Shakespeare dates back to the early 1600s, when there are reports of Hamlet and Richard II being staged upon an East India company ship called The Dragon.  Towards the middle of the 18th century translations and adaptations...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 15 Aug 2014

Messing About on the River Avon!

This coming weekend (5th – 6th July) is the River Festival in Stratford and there will be celebrations and events down at the River Avon. Over the years the river has been used for many different things and has had a few famous faces and interesting...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 3 Jul 2014

The end of a tradition: Charlecote’s deer and Nigel Playfair’s As You Like It

Fallow deer at Charlecote Park As You Like It was in the very first season of plays performed at the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre in April-May 1879. With its references to the Forest of Arden the gently romantic comedy was bound to please. The other Shakespeares...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 5 Mar 2014

A Visit From Ira Aldridge

Norma Hampson is a long-standing volunteer at the Shakespeare Centre Library and Archive and has written this blog to share details from her current project, listing visitors from the early Birthplace visitor books. The Visitor Book for Shakespeare’s...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 17 Jan 2014

Exploring the Origins of Stratford’s Shakespeare Libraries

Last week we welcomed Edina Pillók to the Reading Room, originally from Hungary, but coming to us from Finland, to complete research for her dissertation proposal for a Librarianship course. Edina has chosen a fascinating topic relating to the libraries...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 20 Nov 2013

Tales from the Reading Room – Episode 41

This week saw the centenary of Vivien Leigh’s birth and we were looking at some of the stunning Angus McBean photos we have in our collections of the Vivien and her husband, Laurence Olivier  just recently in order to create a display to accompany...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 7 Nov 2013

Tom Holte – 1960

Love’s Labour’s Lost 1965 This blog series has been written by Ian Dickinson, a professional photographer with some fascinating insights on the photographers and photographic techniques which lay behind our photographic collections. This time...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 6 Aug 2013

Angus McBean – 1950

Figure 1: Merchant of Venice, 1953. Angus McBean This blog series has been written by Ian Dickinson, a professional photographer with some fascinating insights on the photographers and photographic techniques which lay behind our photographic collections. In...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 3 Jul 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.