The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Tarlton's Jests"

Your search for posts with tags containing Tarlton's Jests found 8 posts

Introductory Markup Experiments

This week in my HUMN 100 course we began the TEI module, which will see students tagging individual anecdotes in "Tarlton's Jests" and compiling them into a digital edition. We've been wrestling with some computer problems this term that have made the...
From: Diane Jakacki on 10 Oct 2015

Tarlton’s Jests: TEI update #1

I’ve been experimenting with ways to present Tarlton’s Jests as a work in progress over on The Tarlton Project. I decided that the best way to demonstrate how this project is coming together is to push preliminary experiments, using TEI Boilerplate...
From: Diane Jakacki on 8 Dec 2013

First stab at TEI publication

I’ve spent a lot of time thinking through how best to transcribe  Tarlton’s Jests and represent that process here. I believe there’s value to reflecting upon the materiality of the text, in considering the editorial components of the...
From: The Tarlton Project on 8 Dec 2013

Bits and Bobs

CC Image courtesy of Betsssssy on Flickr. Procrastination technique 4,372: writing a blog post when I should be packing. The movers arrive tomorrow morning bright and early. By Tuesday afternoon I should be in Pennsylvania. By Thursday afternoon (so they...
From: Diane Jakacki on 16 Jun 2013

Preparing for what comes next

I’m approaching a crossroads with the Tarlton Project. I’m perfectly content to continue on working on this on my own for the time-being while I figure out where I’ll be next. But in order for me to do serious research on the scale I...
From: The Tarlton Project on 15 Jan 2013

Go for Github!

Github’s Octocat I’ve uploaded the Tarlton’s Witty Jests XML file at github. You can view (and hopefully collaborate on) it here: http://djakacki.github.com/TarltonsJests/. In my usual fashion I’ve set up the github repository...
From: The Tarlton Project on 8 Jan 2013

Contemplating Crowdsourcing

I continue to think about the best way forward in terms of developing and managing a digital edition of Tarlton’s Jests. I would like to establish a collaborative approach to tagging the files – collaborative in a sense that I think is not...
From: The Tarlton Project on 3 Jan 2013

Work on Tarlton’s Jests Continues

I have added Tarlton’s Jests back as a menu item. For now the page serves as an overview of the publication. At the bottom of the page is a link to my in-progress TEI-encoding for “Tarlton’s Court Wittie Iests.” Work on TEI compliant...
From: The Tarlton Project on 1 Dec 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.