The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "academia"

Showing 1 - 20 of 388

Your search for posts with tags containing academia found 388 posts

Student-Teachers and the Limits of Academic Freedom

The news that this has been a slightly more abysmal year than usual for academic jobs in history has provoked a lot of justified (if impotent) outrage online. An important part of this has centred on the “adjunctification” of the university...
From: memorious on 21 Nov 2017

About that AHA Jobs Chart

People's look-on-the-bright-side comments look a lot like advice someone might have given in 1969: Remember, there are always exciting job opportunities for hardworking people who know how to make steel.
From: The Junto on 20 Nov 2017

Student Soldiers

One of the benefits, or should I say privileges, of teaching at a relatively large public university is the opportunity to teach a fair number of veterans: given the length of the Iraq and Afghanistan operations this will likely be true for the rest of...
From: streets of salem on 10 Nov 2017

Module Conveners and the British Job Market

Today at The Junto, Rachel Herrmann discusses convening modules, and the implications of that role for the UK job market
From: The Junto on 9 Nov 2017

Should you write your dissertation as a book?

Impostor syndrome comes in many forms in academia, and this is how it comes for me: I shouldn’t be a doctor, because I never wrote a dissertation. I just wrote a book. It’s not that I regret the choice. But since that book came out, I’ve...
From: The Junto on 30 Oct 2017

The Winter of Our Discomfort: Speech, Debate, and Learning on Campus

November approaches, and with it thoughts of #snowflakes. I was called one not too long ago, for arguing that a history magazine should not have published a letter promoting a debunked myth and defaming one of its debunkers. The use of editorial discretion...
From: memorious on 26 Oct 2017

Empathy for the Devil

The idea that “Tout comprendre, c’est tout pardonner” has never convinced me. Explanation is not vindication; it’s often the opposite. Historical analysis does not always or even usually result in more sympathetic characters. And...
From: memorious on 4 Oct 2017

History in the Toilet

My last two posts dealt with a troubling letter and article the appeared a peculiar sort of publication: a history magazine. Perched between the worlds of “pop history”, an unwieldy category to which both much good work and a good deal of...
From: memorious on 29 Sep 2017

Why and How You Should Build a Web Presence

For grad students, an online presence has become a key part of one's career portfolio. Guest poster Lindsay Chervinsky offers her thoughts on how to create and manage a web profile.
From: The Junto on 21 Sep 2017

the many-headed monsters’ resources for teaching

Laura Sangha **shiver** The nights are drawing in. There is a cold wind blowing from the east. Berries weigh down the hedgerows. Fungus sprouts on your lawn overnight. The traffic in your inbox has increased tenfold in the last week. That’s right....
From: the many-headed monster on 12 Sep 2017

Relearning how to learn: potential ideas for scholarly debate

We’ve just finished our four-day Before Shakespeare conference, and this blog post is an attempt to report back to the profession more generally about the things that worked or didn’t work in the way we ran the event. A number of delegates...
From: Before Shakespeare on 8 Sep 2017

Guest Post: On Providing Undergraduate Research Opportunities

Guest poster Emily Yankowitz offers first-hand reflections on the value of doing historical research as an undergraduate.
From: The Junto on 8 Sep 2017

Crackpot Historicism

The observation that the Trump era is a good time to be a historian is by now cliché. The routine yet outlandish lies that increasingly puncture public discourse; the proliferation of “fake news” and the appropriation by its makers...
From: memorious on 28 Aug 2017

Roundtable on How NOT To Write Your Second Book: Catherine Kelly on Framing Your Project

This is the final installment of the How NOT TO Write Your Second Book roundtable. Catherine E. Kelly is a professor of history at the University of Oklahoma and editor of the Journal of the Early Republic. Her books include In the New England...
From: The Junto on 26 Aug 2017

Roundtable on How NOT To Write Your Second Book: Tamara Thornton on Choosing New Topics

[We are pleased to have yet another excellent contribution to our “How NOT To Write Your Second Book” Roundtable. Tamara Plakins Thornton is professor of history at the State University of New York, Buffalo, and the author of Cultivating...
From: The Junto on 25 Aug 2017

Roundtable on How NOT To Write Your Second Book: Timothy Mennel on Publishing

Continuing our roundtable "How NOT To Write Your Second Book," Timothy Mennel, the executive editor of University of Chicago Press, looks at how the second book differs from the first.
From: The Junto on 24 Aug 2017

Roundtable on How NOT To Write Your Second Book: Paul Erickson on Fellowship Applications

Paul Erickson of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences contributes to our roundtable on "How NOT To Write Your Second Book" by discussing fellowship applications.
From: The Junto on 23 Aug 2017

Roundtable on How NOT To Write Your Second Book: Kathleen DuVal, “Treating Your Second Book as a Job”

[This post by Kathleen DuVal continues our series on “How NOT To Write Your Second Book.”] If you are reading this, you probably have a goal for yourself that in a certain number of years from now—say ten—you won’t be saying...
From: The Junto on 22 Aug 2017

Roundtable on “How NOT To Write Your Second Book”: Introduction by Emily Conroy-Krutz and Jessica Lepler

[This week we are privileged to feature a roundtable that was organized by Emily Conroy-Krutz and Jessica Lepler and presented at SHEAR’s 2017 conference. It was such a wonderful discuss that it deserved a broader audience. We are grateful that...
From: The Junto on 21 Aug 2017

Book Review of Carla Gardina Pestana’s The English Conquest of Jamaica

It is an exciting time to be a scholar of Caribbean history. From conferences to publications, the past decade has seen historians of early America, Latin America, and the Atlantic world turn to the Caribbean for insights into the development of empire,...
From: The Junto on 15 Aug 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.