The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "academic publishing"

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Your search for posts with tags containing academic publishing found 32 posts

Roundtable on How NOT To Write Your Second Book: Catherine Kelly on Framing Your Project

This is the final installment of the How NOT TO Write Your Second Book roundtable. Catherine E. Kelly is a professor of history at the University of Oklahoma and editor of the Journal of the Early Republic. Her books include In the New England...
From: The Junto on 26 Aug 2017

Roundtable on How NOT To Write Your Second Book: Tamara Thornton on Choosing New Topics

[We are pleased to have yet another excellent contribution to our “How NOT To Write Your Second Book” Roundtable. Tamara Plakins Thornton is professor of history at the State University of New York, Buffalo, and the author of Cultivating...
From: The Junto on 25 Aug 2017

Roundtable on How NOT To Write Your Second Book: Timothy Mennel on Publishing

Continuing our roundtable "How NOT To Write Your Second Book," Timothy Mennel, the executive editor of University of Chicago Press, looks at how the second book differs from the first.
From: The Junto on 24 Aug 2017

What’s the Use of History? A Postscript

Having already devoted my two last posts to John Pepall’s attack on “university historians”, I don’t wish to go on beating a dead horse. But inasmuch as I find his take on the nature of history’s relevance...
From: memorious on 25 May 2017

The Dreaded Second Book

Forgive the self-indulgence of a post about my writing; but it’s my birthday, and I’ll cry if I want to. The hiatus in posts here began as a way of dealing with grading and continued as I shifted gears to the early summer “return to...
From: memorious on 10 May 2017

Guest Post: Finding an Agent

Today, Jennifer Goloboy explains the process of finding an agent, a must for those who hope to publish with most trade presses. Jennifer Goloboy is a literary agent at Red Sofa Literary in St. Paul, MN. She has a PhD in the history of American civilization...
From: The Junto on 18 Apr 2017

Don’t Make Graduate Students Freak Out about Publishing

Sometimes the title tells you all you really need to know. But I did write a little more on this than just the one line, and the piece — a draft of which I tried out here — is now in the Chronicle of Higher Education, in...
From: memorious on 9 Jan 2017

Truth, Freedom, and Productivity: When PR usurps scholarship

No one wants ill-advised assessment regimes imported into higher education. No one wants to see a single-minded, narrow emphasis on quantifying value. No one desires deeply flawed metrics being used to compare institutions and individuals. Nevertheless…[1]...
From: memorious on 10 Sep 2016

Academic publishing and graduate students: Thought for the day

My grandfather was born in 1909: not old enough for the First World War and too old for the Second, he served in the US Navy between the two. He had, I think, about three or four years of elementary school before leaving to work; though...
From: memorious on 17 Jun 2016

Evolution of an Article

In summer 2010 I sat in the house furnished by Rhys Isaac in Colonial Williamsburg, and attempted to write my first dissertation chapter. I’d just finished my first research trip, to Library and Archives Canada, in Ottawa, and was in the middle...
From: The Junto on 16 Mar 2016

Promoting Your Book

Historian Thomas Kidd recently published some suggestions on the dos and don’ts of promoting your academic book. His recommendations, which included suggestions of not joining social media just for the purpose of promoting your book was good. My...
From: The Junto on 3 Feb 2016

History Wars Continue

In the 1990s, one theater of the “Culture Wars” became dubbed the “History Wars,” as politicians and political interest groups attempted to influence or control the presentation of historical events and developments in high school...

Digital Humanities Position in Military History

Rowan Technology Solutions, LLC is looking to hire a talented, creative, and agile historian to partner with the United States Military Academy, Department of History building innovative digital learning products. The selected candidate will be responsible...

Dissertation Writing

The Chronicle of Higher Education has published a piece on dissertation writing with some simple, straightforward advice: Write! The advice piece suggests that “there is only one fail-safe method, one secret, one guaranteed trick that you need in...

The Problem with Big Books; Or, Alan Taylor’s Biggest Sin

[Headlines are supposed to draw readers, right?] One of the first things I did after finishing my dissertation a couple months back (other than sleeping for an entire week, of course), was reading Alan Taylor’s latest tome, An Internal Enemy:...
From: The Junto on 19 Jun 2014

Celebrating the digital — anniversaries

June for me means a series of mini-anniversaries. First, and smallest, is the six-month anniversary of this blog. I started it in December to set down some of my thoughts on digital broadcasts and I’m happy to say that my first post on the RSC’s Richard...
From: Digital Shakespeares on 17 Jun 2014

A Conversation with Early American Studies

Sara Damiano recaps the McNeil Center's recent Brown Bag with Early American Studies editor Dallett Hemphill and invites conversation on future directions for the journal.
From: The Junto on 1 Oct 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.