The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing early modern found 1471 posts

Engaging MLIS Students with Recipe Transcription: Mariabella Charles’s Book of Cookery Recipes and Medical Cures (ca. 1678)

Philip S. Palmer, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library (UCLA) While planning a microgrant project when I was a Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) fellow from 2014-16, my colleagues and I were interested combining TEI, special collections,...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 Sep 2017

A Day at Home in Early Modern England: exclusive taster!

We’re delighted to announce that our co-authored book, A Day at Home in Early Modern England: material culture and domestic life 1500-1700 will be published by Yale University Press on 3 October. On the front cover is a drawing from the Trevelyon...
From: Material Histories on 12 Sep 2017

Of God and Jonson: theatre history, new things and non-events

I was fortunate to be able to attend some of the superb Before Shakespeare conference at Roehampton last week. I came away with a range of thoughts and ideas, some of which I hope to pursue in one form or another. Perhaps the thing that struck me most,...
From: Mathew Lyons on 11 Sep 2017

Wilton History Festival: the Countess of Pembroke and her circle

Just a brief post to say I will be speaking at Wilton History Festival on 17 September about the literary circle around Mary Sidney and the power of patronage. For those who don’t know, Mary Sidney was the younger sister Philip Sidney and is the...
From: Mathew Lyons on 6 Sep 2017

Newberry Graduate Conference

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library has issued a call for papers for its Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference: 2018 Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference Call for Papers January 25 to 27, 2018 We invite abstracts...

Renaissance College: Corpus Christi College, Oxford in Context, c.1450-c.16

6-9 September 2017Corpus Christi College, Oxford was founded, on humanistic principles, in 1517. Its fellows included specially-appointed lecturers in Latin literature, Greek and Theology and its new trilingual library featured works in Latin, Greek and...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 6 Sep 2017

Volume 5: Call for Papers – ‘Representations and Recollections of Empire’

VOLUME 5: CALL FOR PAPERS ‘Representations and Recollections of Empire’ Cerae invites essay submissions on the theme of ‘Representations and Recollections of Empire’. In its broadest sense, empire as a term is used to describe...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 4 Sep 2017

Open Opportunities

Administered from the University of Western Australia, Cerae is an open-access, peer reviewed journal directed by a committee of interstate and international graduate students and early career researchers. We are united in our commitment to open access...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 3 Sep 2017

Transcribathon Banquet

  Please join us virtually for our 3rd annual onlinel Transcribathon on Tuesday, November 7, where we will have a number of texts available for transcription. In the past Transcribathons, we have worked only on one text, Rebeckah Winche (Folger...
From: emroc on 1 Sep 2017

The Live Chicken Treatment for Buboes: Trying a Plague Cure in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

By Erik Heinrichs  While researching German plague treatises I became fascinated by one odd treatment for buboes that appeared again and again, despite sounding so far-fetched. One sixteenth-century version calls for plucking the feathers from around...
From: The Recipes Project on 31 Aug 2017

True but not Tested: Experimentation in the Apothecary’s Shop

By Valentina Pugliano Testing and standardization are firmly entrenched in the pharmacological imagination of western biomedicine and its public. Before a new drug can be put on the market, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration demands five rounds of...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Aug 2017

Cynophobia and the streets of early modern London

By Jennifer Jorm (The University of Queensland)   A mad dog on the run in a London street: citizens attack it as it approaches a woman who has fallen over. Coloured etching by T.L. Busby, 1826. Courtesy of the Trustees of the Wellcome Library,...
From: Histories of Emotion on 25 Aug 2017

Cerae Receives the Matilda Award

Michael, Tara and Imogen accepting the Matilda Award Cerae is proud to announce that we have been selected to receive the Bryant Stokes Matilda Award for Cultural Excellence, 2017. The Matilda Award recognises outstanding achievement in cultural pursuits...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 22 Aug 2017

When Does a Drug Trial End?

By Justin Rivest The question I’d like to begin this post by asking is, When does a drug enter “normal use”? Is a trial a “provisional” phase, that reaches a definitive end, say when “proof” is found, or when...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Aug 2017

Intrigue and Incantation: Treasonous Magic in Medieval and Early Modern England

Between the 1320s and the 1620s a significant proportion of all accusations of high treason in England involved a magical element. People were accused of casting the horoscope of the […]
From: Inner Lives on 21 Aug 2017

Elizabeth Tanfield Cary and the reception of “An Epitaph upon the Death of the Duke of Buckingham”

Four hundred and eleven years ago this week, George Villiers, the first duke of Buckingham, checked into a Portsmouth inn called The Greyhound. He wouldn’t live long enough to check out. Not long afterwards, a six-line epitaph in the duke’s...
From: RECIRC on 18 Aug 2017

‘This one is good’: Recipes, Testing and Lay Practitioners in Early German Print

By Tillmann Taape Having recently finished my doctoral thesis on the printed works of Hieronymus Brunschwig, which have previously featured on the Recipes Blog (here and here), I am delighted to contribute to this series of posts on testing and trying...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Aug 2017

Exploring CPP 10a214: Of Binaries and Collaboration

By Rebecca Laroche and Hillary Nunn When we began this blog project in February 2013, we did not know where it was going to take us. We always saw our work with College of Physicians of Philadelphia Manuscript 10a214 as a work in progress, a work on progress....
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Aug 2017

Marvelous Maltese Medicines

I have just got back from a lovely stay in Malta. I spent many hours learning about the military history of the Island, and went round the rather splendid Museum of the Knight’s Hospitallers. Although the museum doesn’t have very many historical...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 15 Aug 2017

Workshop Report: Approaching Inner Lives: Thinking, Feeling, Believing, 1300-19

It is now a commonplace for every discussion of the history of the emotions to start with reference to an ‘affective turn’, but the overcoming of historians by emotion of […]
From: Inner Lives on 15 Aug 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.