The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "free"

Showing 1 - 20 of 201

Your search for posts with tags containing free found 201 posts

December 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Journal (December 10, 1767).“One of the most useful and entertaining Almanacks in America.” The new year was fast approaching. Just three weeks remained in...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Dec 2017

On Mendacious and Shitty Academic Punditry

[I have meant to write a blog post about this almost since my last one went up, but Twitter threads keep coming out instead. What’s below is an amplified version of one of them, so apologies in advance to Twitter followers of mine who tire of harangues....
From: memorious on 5 Dec 2017

Phyllis Wheatley and the Abolitionist Alternative

By Spencer Jackson, The University of Queensland Near the end of his wonderful new history of the Russian Revolution, October,[1] China Miéville quotes Bruno Schulz’s 1937 reflections on ‘events that have no place of their own in time’....
From: Histories of Emotion on 30 Nov 2017

Shakespeare for Freedom: Why the Plays Matter

Kiernan Ryan and Ewan Fernie in  conversation. We are happy to share CUP’s recording of Ewan Fernie’s and Kiernan Ryan’s conversation on Shakespeare for Freedom. CUP states that: Shakespeare for Freedom presents a powerful,...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 27 Nov 2017

Student-Teachers and the Limits of Academic Freedom

The news that this has been a slightly more abysmal year than usual for academic jobs in history has provoked a lot of justified (if impotent) outrage online. An important part of this has centred on the “adjunctification” of the university...
From: memorious on 21 Nov 2017

November 14

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (November 14, 1767).“He has two swift-sailing small Sloops, which ply constantly between Providence and Newport.” Readers of the Providence Gazette...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Nov 2017

The Winter of Our Discomfort: Speech, Debate, and Learning on Campus

November approaches, and with it thoughts of #snowflakes. I was called one not too long ago, for arguing that a history magazine should not have published a letter promoting a debunked myth and defaming one of its debunkers. The use of editorial discretion...
From: memorious on 26 Oct 2017

Help Us Protect Hunting & Gun Ownership In Australia.

Help us protect hunting The Shooters Fishers and Farmers Party on on the attack after new regulations have been delivered. Here is how it will affect you and what you can do to help.  The Liberal - National New South Wales Government has released...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 28 Jul 2017

Martha Washington's Philadelphia Supervision of the President's House Food & Her Chef's Freedom

1793 John Trumbull (1756-1843). Martha Dandridge Custis Washington (1731-1802)  (Daniel Parke Custis) (George Washington) Hercules: Master of Cuisine, Slave of Washington The Philadelphia Inquier  February 21 & 22, 2010 by Craig LaBan,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 27 Jul 2017

George Washington's celebrated, enslaved cook, Hercules

Attributed to Gilbert Stuart (1755–1828) Assumed to be a Portrait of Hercules, George Washington's Cook, 1797Hercules was an enslaved African held at Mount Vernon, George Washington's Virginia plantation on the Potomac River. He was the head cook at...
From: 18th-century American Women on 9 Sep 2013

Life for Martha Washington at Mount Vernon Before the Presidency

1757 Detail John Wollaston (1710-1775) Martha Dandridge Custis Washington (1731-1802)  (Daniel Parke Custis) (George Washington) Life for Martha Washington at Mount Vernon Before the Presidency At Mount Vernon, Martha Dandridge Custis Washington's...
From: 18th-century American Women on 25 Jul 2017

Martha Dandridge Custis Washington 1731-1802 (Mrs George Washington) & Slavery

1790s Christian Gullager 1759-1826 George Washington.When George Washington took over Mount Vernon at age 22, there were 18 slaves. When he married he gained control of 200 more which technically belonged to the estate of his wife’s first husband....
From: 18th-century American Women on 14 Jul 2017

Abigail Smith Adams (1744-1818), Mrs. John Adams, Disagrees with George Washington's Ownership of Slaves

Abigail Smith Adams (1744-1818), Mrs. John Adams, by Gilbert Stuart, ca. 1800-1815. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.Elizabeth Bissell Miller, “Abigail Adams,” The Digital Encyclopedia of George WashingtonGeorge Washington owned...
From: 18th-century American Women on 4 Jul 2017

Quacks & Hacks: Walter Freeman and the Lobotomobile

  On 12 November 1935, a Portuguese neurologist named Antonio Egas Moniz [below right] became the first individual to perform what would later be known as a lobotomy. Moniz’s work built upon that of the 19th-century Swiss psychiatrist, Gottlieb...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 14 Jun 2017

New Theme: AltoFocus

Today we’re happy to announce the latest addition to our collection of free themes: AltoFocus! AltoFocus is a spinoff of the original AutoFocus theme from a few years ago. Its elegant tiled layout helps artists, photobloggers, and other...

The Road Not Taken, By Robert Frost. For my young friend Swamp Fox who has just graduated.

The Road Not TakenTwo roads diverged in a yellow wood,And sorry I could not travel bothAnd be one traveller, long I stoodAnd looked down one as far as I couldTo where it bent in the undergrowth;Then took the other, as just as fair,And having perhaps the...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 23 May 2017

Page 1 of 11123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.