The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing history found 6780 posts

Hyping the history of mathematics

A while back the Internet was full of reports about a sensational discovery in the history of mathematics. Two researchers had apparently proved that a well know Babylonian cuneiform clay tablet (Plimpton 322), which contains a list of Pythagorean triples,...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 19 Sep 2017

The Covenanters’ Revenge in Galston #History #Scotland

In December, 1688, a party of armed Covenanters ejected the ministers of several parishes in Ayrshire. At Galston, they seized the minister Robert Simpson, took him to the churchyard and tore his cloak. However, then they went a step further, as they...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 19 Sep 2017

Pirates & Privateers Newsletter.

https://pub47.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=471&usernum=3977197897&e=historicaltrekker%40gmail.com&cname=Keith
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 19 Sep 2017

Information and Ideology in Henri-Antoine Mézière’s Canadian Age of Revolutions

This post is a part of a series entitled “(In)forming Revolution: Information Networks in the Age of Revolutions.” By Jordan Taylor In early 1792, a young French Canadian named Henri-Antoine Mézière published a short polemic...
From: Age of Revolutions on 18 Sep 2017

Gentlemen and Players: Further Thoughts from the State of Maritime Historical Research Conference 2017

One of the issues floating around at the fringes of the Greenwich conference on 9 September, the thrust of which can be found in my previous blogpost, was that of the perceived division in maritime history between ‘professional’ and ‘amateur’...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 18 Sep 2017

The Modern Reenactor: If you would not be forgotten...

The Modern Reenactor: If you would not be forgotten...: Following Benjamin Franklin's advice, I thought I'd write something that might be worth the reading. In his Poor Richard's Alman...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 16 Sep 2017

Sgian Dubh

Many people who visit Scotland love discovering more about the traditional Highland dress and part of that is the Sgian Dubh. Today the Sgian Dubh (pronounced ‘skian doo) is a small single edged blade worn at the calf, tucked into your sock. The...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 15 Sep 2017

The Great Man paradox – A coda: biographies

This is a follow up to my last post that was inspired by an interesting discussion on Twitter and by the comment on that post by Paul Engle, author of the excellent Conciatore: The Life and Times of 17th Century Glassmaker Antonio Neri. It is clear to...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 14 Sep 2017

Busy Bees

I know that bees are experiencing some serious challenges at the moment, but it seems to me that there are much more of them out there than in previous summers—at least in our region. I’ve encountered mini-swarms on rural walks in both New...
From: streets of salem on 14 Sep 2017

The Prince of Wales’ visit to Liverpool in September 1806

During the autumn of 1806, the Prince of Wales (later George IV) and his brother William, Duke of Clarence (later William IV), undertook a tour of several of the counties of England. We are going to look at just one of their destinations today, their...
From: All Things Georgian on 14 Sep 2017

Engaging MLIS Students with Recipe Transcription: Mariabella Charles’s Book of Cookery Recipes and Medical Cures (ca. 1678)

Philip S. Palmer, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library (UCLA) While planning a microgrant project when I was a Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) fellow from 2014-16, my colleagues and I were interested combining TEI, special collections,...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 Sep 2017

How to Change History: William Petty, Irish slavery, and a fake debate

Treating debunked pseudo-history and personal attacks as legitimate criticism of historical research is bad enough on the letters page of a widely-read history magazine. Publishing articles based on spurious sources is worse. In my last post, I discussed...
From: memorious on 13 Sep 2017

Tales from the Archives: Of Dirty Books and Bread

As our loyal readers know, yesterday we celebrated our fifth birthday! We now have over 500 posts in our archives and over 120 pages for readers to sift through. What a wealth of knowledge on recipes from our wonderful contributors. However, with so much...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Sep 2017

Q&A with Coll Thrush

Today Coll Thrush speaks with The Junto about his most recent book, Indigenous London: Native Travelers at the Heart of Empire, which examines that city’s history through the experiences of Indigenous travelers—willing or otherwise—from...
From: The Junto on 12 Sep 2017

the many-headed monsters’ resources for teaching

Laura Sangha **shiver** The nights are drawing in. There is a cold wind blowing from the east. Berries weigh down the hedgerows. Fungus sprouts on your lawn overnight. The traffic in your inbox has increased tenfold in the last week. That’s right....
From: the many-headed monster on 12 Sep 2017

Native Americans and the use of Brass Kettles©

https://thehistoricfoodie.wordpress.com/2012/01/11/native-americans-and-the-use-of-brass-kettles/
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 12 Sep 2017

A Very Palpable Hit: the State of Maritime Historical Research Conference 2017

Greenwich, 0900, Saturday 9 September: will anybody actually come? will the speakers be any good? will the technology work? is this, the first conference that the Society for Nautical Research has ever staged under its own auspices, going to be a success?...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 11 Sep 2017

Of God and Jonson: theatre history, new things and non-events

I was fortunate to be able to attend some of the superb Before Shakespeare conference at Roehampton last week. I came away with a range of thoughts and ideas, some of which I hope to pursue in one form or another. Perhaps the thing that struck me most,...
From: Mathew Lyons on 11 Sep 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.