The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "history"

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Your search for posts with tags containing history found 6950 posts

Two murders in a Derbyshire village 1815 and 1819

The first murder took place about a couple of miles from the murderer’s home of Litton, a pretty village in the middle of the Peak district, a mere stone’s throw from the beautiful Chatsworth House. The murderer, one Anthony Lingard was...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 Nov 2017

Thanksgiving Menus

If there is one genre of history that has benefitted particularly and immensely from digitization, it is culinary history: cookbooks from all ages are readily available and I easily mined two collections of restaurant menus to come up with a portfolio...
From: streets of salem on 23 Nov 2017

My journey towards knotty history with the Recipes Project – reflections of a medical herbalist

by Anne Stobart Starting from a science background ‘That is bad history!’ scowled my history lecturer back a decade or so. Yikes, what could I have done wrong? I felt struck down, so ashamed to have committed some major error, even deserving...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Nov 2017

Juggling information

One of the parlour games played by intellectuals and academic, as well as those who like to think of themselves as such, is which famous historical figures would you invite to a cocktail or dinner party and why. One premise for the game being, which historical...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 22 Nov 2017

When Marmalade was Medicinal.

I must admit to a guilty pleasure – hot buttered toast with a (very!) thick covering of marmalade. Worse than that, I’m even fussy; it absolutely has to be a certain brand, and a particular type…none of your weedy shredless stuff for...
From: DrAlun on 22 Nov 2017

National Museum of the American Indian. A Link.

 Joseph Brant, by Gore Romney My thanks to my friend Swampfox for supplying this link. Thanks mate.Keith.http://www.nmai.si.edu/searchcollections/peoplescultures.aspx
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 22 Nov 2017

Updates from the Hearth Tax Centre

As 2017 draws to a close, there have been a number of exciting changes here at the Hearth Tax Centre. New Research Officer We have welcomed Charlie Berry to the Centre as Research Officer, taking over from John Price who moved on earlier this year. Alongside...
From: Hearth Tax Online on 21 Nov 2017

Give us our Daily Bread

Bread, a staple of part of the diet today as much as it was in the Georgian era. Hardly something controversial or so you would think. Kitchen Interior with Still Life by Samuel Smith; Bury Art MuseumIn 1757 the weight of a penny loaf was set to reflect...
From: All Things Georgian on 21 Nov 2017

Reading the London Cries: how to analyse food sellers in art

By Charlie Taverner (Birkbeck, University of London) This post is part of the European Institute for the History and Cultures of Food (IEHCA) series “Summer University on Food and Drink Studies” Across early modern Europe, wandering...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 Nov 2017

New Developments on Essex Street

I was going to title this post “the good, the bad, and the ugly” but decided to stay a bit more neutral, and yet here I am leading off with this hackneyed phrase! That’s my preview, so beware. Essex Street, Salem’s venerable main...
From: streets of salem on 21 Nov 2017

Group Forum Moving to a New Site. Please sign up for membership.

As many of you may have realised by now our group forum was taken over by Tapatalk, since then I have had a lot of problems, & the HELP at tapatalk is non existent. SO, I checked with other members on this forum & we decided to move to another...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 20 Nov 2017

Teaching English composition with early modern-style “commonplace books”

This fall, I have been trying out a number of strategies to integrate writing exercises, literary readings, and Special Collections visits in my undergraduate pedagogy. These experiments – that’s the word I prefer to use – allow the...
From: Vade Mecum on 20 Nov 2017

Manliness and the Making of the Revolutionary War in Cherokee Country

This post is a part of our “Native American Revolutions” Series. By Michael Lynch In the Appalachian mountains, the American Revolution was a contest for land and liberty—between Revolutionaries and the British Crown, as well as between...
From: Age of Revolutions on 20 Nov 2017

The Tenth Commandment: the Depth of Sin

Jonathan Willis (For the first, introductory post in the series, click here) After a brief mid-term hiatus, in this last post marking the publication last month of my latest monograph, The Reformation of the Decalogue, I want to explore the Tenth Commandment....
From: the many-headed monster on 20 Nov 2017

“Double bewitchment”: Love-Beams, the Mutual Gaze, and the Interpenetrating Visions of Marsilio Ficino’s De Amore

I have been arguing for a medieval and early modern paramaterial phantasy which paradoxically positioned the phantasy and its spirits somewhere between the material and the immaterial, and between the body and the soul. In this post, I want to explore...

Thomas Archer in the Argyll Rising of 1685 #History #Scotland

In 1685, the minister Thomas Archer had been sent as an agent for the Earl of Argyll to Ireland. During the Argyll Rising, he and a few recruits joined it at Rothesay on Bute: ‘Mr. Thomas Archer, who was sent from Holland to advertise our friends...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 16 Nov 2017

Theatrical disturbances and actors behaving badly: what the Drury Lane Prompter’s Journal tells us about nineteenth-century theatrical life

Guest post by Dr. Sarah Burdett What was life like inside the nineteenth-century London theatre? How smoothly did performances run? And how professionally did actors behave? The Drury Lane Prompter’s Journal, 1812-1818, held at the Folger, provides...
From: The Collation on 16 Nov 2017

Connecting my Courses

This is that time in the semester when I am inevitably behind in my course content, racing towards the end of classes in early December: in one course I’m only in thirteenth century when I should be in the fourteenth; in another I’m in the...
From: streets of salem on 16 Nov 2017

The Last Days of Mary Ann Burdock

We are delighted to welcome back to our blog, the author Naomi Clifford. For her book Women and the Gallows 1797-1837: Unfortunate Wretches, Naomi researched the stories of the 131 women who were hanged in England and Wales between 1797 and 1837. Here...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Nov 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.