The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "literature"

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Your search for posts with tags containing literature found 650 posts

Bewitched Girls and Seafaring Boys

These days I don’t have much time to read fiction in general, and I tend to avoid novels set in Salem in particular, but I’m always on the lookout for later nineteenth and early twentieth-century novels with alluring covers as part of my ever-increasing,...
From: streets of salem on 20 Sep 2017

3 Poldark 8 & 9: like a song; previously individual dramatized scenes ….

She will have a headstone (Ross and Demelza, Aidan Turner, Elinor Tomlinson, Poldark 2017, Episode 8) Warleggan harassing, destroying Drake’s business (Sam telling Ross, David Delve, Robin Ellis, Poldark 1977, Episode 8) Dear friends and readers,...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 14 Sep 2017

Wilton History Festival: the Countess of Pembroke and her circle

Just a brief post to say I will be speaking at Wilton History Festival on 17 September about the literary circle around Mary Sidney and the power of patronage. For those who don’t know, Mary Sidney was the younger sister Philip Sidney and is the...
From: Mathew Lyons on 6 Sep 2017

Literature and the Turn Towards Grief

One of the things that a number of people have remarked upon in my public postings about my husband is that I write in a way that comforts them; some people are even asking how it is that I am able to do this. The short answer is simply that I have no...
From: The Seacoast of Bohemia on 3 Sep 2017

“Very fit for a Saturday morning’s declamation”

Yesterday we left William Wirt at about age thirteen in 1785 or so, chafing at an unjust accusation and physical punishment by his school’s usher, or assistant master. Wirt was living with the master of his school, the Rev. James Hunt, and from...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Aug 2017

Cynophobia and the streets of early modern London

By Jennifer Jorm (The University of Queensland)   A mad dog on the run in a London street: citizens attack it as it approaches a woman who has fallen over. Coloured etching by T.L. Busby, 1826. Courtesy of the Trustees of the Wellcome Library,...
From: Histories of Emotion on 25 Aug 2017

‘Game of Thrones’ is not Historical

The books of George R. R. Martin and the HBO fictional televisions series, Game of Thrones, are not historical. They do not bear any relation to the reality of the human past, have not been assembled according to the rules of historical discourse, and...
From: wartsandbrawls on 24 Aug 2017

Sergeant Simon Giffin and his journal of the Revolution

In the early morning of May 30, 1777, my distant grandfather Sgt. Simon Giffin of Wethersfield, Connecticut left his home and followed the dirt... The post Sergeant Simon Giffin and his journal of the Revolution appeared first on Journal of the American...

Post-Apocalyptic Bandits: Mary Shelley’s “The Last Man” (1826)

I am the native of a sea-surrounded nook, a cloud-enshadowed land, which, when the surface of the globe, with its shoreless ocean and trackless continents, presents itself to my mind, appears only as an inconsiderable speck in the immense whole. [i] The...

3 Poldark 6 & 7: Coerced & reluctant relationships; Agatha’s death, Ross’s refusal, Demelza charmed

[Draft stage because without stills] Dear friends and readers, My header this time refers more or as much to Graham’s books, The Black Moon and The Four Swans, and the 1977 second season episodes 6-7 as it does to this new third season episodes...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 7 Aug 2017

Emotions: History, Culture, Society: Call for Themed Issues

By Katie Barclay, The University of Adelaide Last week, as one of the editors of Emotions: History, Culture, Society (EHCS), I attended a ‘Meet the Editors’ event that ran as part of the 2017 International Society for Research on Emotion conference...
From: Histories of Emotion on 4 Aug 2017

Review: Emigrants by James Evans

Otto von Bismarck was once asked to identify the pre-eminent fact in modern world history. That America spoke English, he replied. In Emigrants, James Evans attempts to explain how and why that happened. For much of the 17th century, England was something...
From: Mathew Lyons on 2 Aug 2017

Review: So High A Blood by Morgan Ring

So High A Blood explores in detail the life of Margaret, Countess of Lennox, a Tudor princess without whom, perhaps, there would have been no Stewart succession and no subsequent union between England and Scotland. Born in 1515, Margaret was the daughter...
From: Mathew Lyons on 2 Aug 2017

New Poldark 3:4-5: a deeper emotionalism; a loss of verbal subtleties, and sheer exciting adventure

Episode 4 again emphasizes Demelza’s self-reliance: she is shown to give birth with just Prudie’s help (Eleanor Tomlinson, Beatie Edney) — this is one of Horsfield’s additions Episode 5 ends in moving funeral for Captain Henshawe...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 26 Jul 2017

Ithaca in Stratford-upon-Avon: A Tribute to Sir Derek Walcott.

By Miranda Jones, Research Advocate, The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust Derek Walcott In 1991 the Artistic Director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, Adrian Noble, discussed the next potential project for the Stratford-upon-Avon stage with Gregory Doran....
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 25 Jul 2017

Thomas Fleming: Four Pages a Day

The author Thomas Fleming died this week at the age of ninety. As I described back here, in 1960 Tom was a journalist putting out his first book. Now We Are Enemies was the first full-length narrative of the Battle of Bunker Hill published since the nineteenth...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Jul 2017

Review: Lorna Doone: The Wild & Wanton Edition by M.J. Porteus

Lorna Doone by R.D. Blackmore is considered a classic work of literature and for good reason. John Ridd is an amiable protagonist who falls in love with the equally amiable Lorna Doone, a young woman from a criminal, thuggish family which he has always...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 22 Jul 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.