The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing literature found 662 posts

Teaching English composition with early modern-style “commonplace books”

This fall, I have been trying out a number of strategies to integrate writing exercises, literary readings, and Special Collections visits in my undergraduate pedagogy. These experiments – that’s the word I prefer to use – allow the...
From: Vade Mecum on 20 Nov 2017

Review: Summer’s Last Will and Testament by Thomas Nashe

  Saturday 30 September saw a unique staging of Thomas Nashe’s only extant whole-authored play, Summer’s Last Will and Testament, in the Great Hall of the Bishop’s Palace in Croydon, where it was first performed in the early autumn...
From: Mathew Lyons on 10 Nov 2017

Erasmus on the Arts in Luther’s Reformation: A Tragedy

By Kirk Essary, The University of Western Australia The arts had affective import for Erasmus on multiple levels. The emotions themselves are described by the Dutch humanist in categories derived from the ars rhetorica, and according to the genres of...
From: Histories of Emotion on 10 Nov 2017

Britishness and Whiteness in Early Canadian Culture

Oana Godeanu-Kenworthy In the September 28, 2017 issue of the New York Review of Books, Fintan O’Toole explained Brexit as the consequence of a rebirth of English nationalism: “Brexit is a peaceful revolution but it is unmistakably a nationalist...
From: Borealia on 23 Oct 2017

Outlander, the second season, a differently framed Dragonfly in Amber

[Blog in Progess!!, come back for the 2nd and last 3rd tomorrow night] Claire grieving over her stillborn child, POV Mother superior (Caitrionia Balfe, Frances de la Tour, Episode 7, Faith) Dear friends and readers, It’s been eight months since...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 20 Oct 2017

The Emotional Intelligence of Medieval Didactic Literature for Children

By Juanita Feros Ruys (The University of Sydney) Didactic literature of the Middle Ages might seem a strange place to look for instruction in emotional intelligence. After all, medieval didactic literature is renowned for being dry, prescriptive (‘Do…’),...
From: Histories of Emotion on 6 Oct 2017

Ecstasy: Notes from the Literary and Philosophical Traditions

By Peter Holbrook (The University of Queensland) Nigel Milsom (Australia 1975– ) Judo House Part 6 (The White Bird) 2014–15 oil on linen 230 x 194 cm Collection: Art Gallery of New South Wales – Contemporary Collection Benefactors 2015,...
From: Histories of Emotion on 29 Sep 2017

Mary, Countess of Shrewsbury: poetry, patronage and power

This is, more or less, the text of the talk I gave earlier this month at the Wilton History Festival. Mary, Countess of Shrewsbury and the Pembroke family were the most influential patrons of the Elizabethan and Jacobean era. Let’s begin with a...
From: Mathew Lyons on 27 Sep 2017

The Last Dying Speech and Confession of Jack Straw

In 1381, one of the most important events in English medieval history occurred: the Peasants’ Revolt. Under the leadership of a former soldier, Wat Tyler (d. 1381), a radical priest, John Ball (d. 1381), and Jack Straw (d. 1381), approximately 50,000...

Feeling Shakespeare at the Pop-up Globe

By Adam Hembree, The University of Melbourne Image: ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ cast members perform a dance that mixes Jacobean and Maori dances. Photo: Eddie Jim. Courtesy of the Sydney Morning Herald.Opening later this month, the Pop-up...
From: Histories of Emotion on 22 Sep 2017

Bewitched Girls and Seafaring Boys

These days I don’t have much time to read fiction in general, and I tend to avoid novels set in Salem in particular, but I’m always on the lookout for later nineteenth and early twentieth-century novels with alluring covers as part of my ever-increasing,...
From: streets of salem on 20 Sep 2017

3 Poldark 8 & 9: like a song; previously individual dramatized scenes ….

She will have a headstone (Ross and Demelza, Aidan Turner, Elinor Tomlinson, Poldark 2017, Episode 8) Warleggan harassing, destroying Drake’s business (Sam telling Ross, David Delve, Robin Ellis, Poldark 1977, Episode 8) Dear friends and readers,...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 14 Sep 2017

Wilton History Festival: the Countess of Pembroke and her circle

Just a brief post to say I will be speaking at Wilton History Festival on 17 September about the literary circle around Mary Sidney and the power of patronage. For those who don’t know, Mary Sidney was the younger sister Philip Sidney and is the...
From: Mathew Lyons on 6 Sep 2017

Literature and the Turn Towards Grief

One of the things that a number of people have remarked upon in my public postings about my husband is that I write in a way that comforts them; some people are even asking how it is that I am able to do this. The short answer is simply that I have no...
From: The Seacoast of Bohemia on 3 Sep 2017

“Very fit for a Saturday morning’s declamation”

Yesterday we left William Wirt at about age thirteen in 1785 or so, chafing at an unjust accusation and physical punishment by his school’s usher, or assistant master. Wirt was living with the master of his school, the Rev. James Hunt, and from...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Aug 2017

Cynophobia and the streets of early modern London

By Jennifer Jorm (The University of Queensland)   A mad dog on the run in a London street: citizens attack it as it approaches a woman who has fallen over. Coloured etching by T.L. Busby, 1826. Courtesy of the Trustees of the Wellcome Library,...
From: Histories of Emotion on 25 Aug 2017

‘Game of Thrones’ is not Historical

The books of George R. R. Martin and the HBO fictional televisions series, Game of Thrones, are not historical. They do not bear any relation to the reality of the human past, have not been assembled according to the rules of historical discourse, and...
From: wartsandbrawls on 24 Aug 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.