The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags/categories containing london found 345 posts

Showing 1 - 20 of 345

Shakespeare in Love – the play

A scene from the stage version of Shakespeare In Love This evening, 23 July, is the official opening of the new London West End play Shakespeare in Love, Lee Hall’s new version of the much-loved 1998 film of the same name. Rumours have been circulating...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 23 Jul 2014

Don Giovanni in Flanders

Spanish attack on a Flemish village,Attr:  Pieter Snayers.In the winter of 1603-04, Glassmaker Antonio Neri embarked on what would become a seven-year-long visit to Antwerp to stay with his friend, Emmanuel Ximenes, one of the richest men in...
From: Conciatore on 23 Jul 2014

The Windsor Nell Gwynn Knew

As royal mistresses go, Nell Gwynn is probably our most favourite of King Charles II's mistresses - and with good reason. This saucy, funny, beautiful actress was quite a loveable character - and her royal lover certainly knew that. John Evelyn referred...
From: Hoydens and Firebrands on 20 Jul 2014

Henry Stebbing

The Rev. Henry Stebbing (1716—1787), FRS, FSA, seems to have been as mild and pleasant a man as he is said by his son to have been. His personality may have been influenced by that of his father, Rev. Henry Stebbing (1687—1763), who was anything but....
From: Kirby and his world on 18 Jul 2014

Conference Favourites from ‘Revisiting Early Modern Prophecies’

This year’s conference season was brief but intense for me, with conferences back to back in London and Görlitz. Instead of writing about my own talks, I’ve decided instead to highlight a few papers by other scholars that I particularly enjoyed....
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 12 Jul 2014

Conference Favourites from ‘Revisiting Early Modern Prophecies’

This year’s conference season was brief but intense for me, with conferences back to back in London and Görlitz. Instead of writing about my own talks, I’ve decided to highlight a few papers by other scholars that I particularly enjoyed....
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 12 Jul 2014

Lies, secrets and death on the eve of the Glorious Revolution

The Bitter Trade by Piers Alexander is a historical novel set in the murky world of London’s coffee houses on the eve of the Glorious Revolution. The son of an English dissenter and a French Huguenot, its young redhead hero Calumny Spinks lives under...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 10 Jul 2014

George Carpenter, Mealman of Wapping

A farthing token issued by George Carpenter – A mid-17th century grain dealer of Wapping, London. The above copper farthing token measures 15.6 mm in diameter and weighs 0.80 grams. It was most likely issued in the 1650s. The token was issued by...
From: Mr. Pepys' Small Change on 9 Jul 2014

St. Thomas More to His Daughter Meg

Beyond his martyrdom and his status as a patron saint, Thomas More provides us with such examples of humanity that tear the veil between us and the past. On July 5, 1535, the day before his execution, he wrote to his daughter Margaret, commenting...

A New Sort of Holyday for Husbands, or a warning to troublesome wives, 1733

Here is a particularly heartwarming (*cough*) report of one man’s enthusiastic embrace of widowhood in London in 1733. Yes folks, the ‘new holyday for husbands’ is to be enjoyed when your troublesome wife drops dead. Charming. (Although...
From: The History of Love on 3 Jul 2014

On This Day: 2 July

I’ve always been a fan of those “On This Day” features you often see in newspapers and now online. This is probably picked up from my Dad who has a wonderful memory for dates and can usually be relied upon to find and remember the most...

Riotous Violence: Early-Modern Football

And now for something completely different: football. Admittedly, I have but the most tenuous of excuses for this excursion, provided in a roundabout manner by the ‘Revisiting Early Modern Prophecies’ conference (26-28 June). It also feel...
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 2 Jul 2014

Riotous Violence: Early-Modern Football

And now for something completely different: football. Admittedly, I have but the most tenuous of excuses for this excursion, provided in a roundabout manner by the ‘Revisiting Early Modern Prophecies’ conference (26-28 June). It also feel...
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 2 Jul 2014

May 2014

I should have posted this ages ago but it’s better late than never, I suppose! Although this blog will still retain its emphasis on women’s history, I also really enjoy sharing more about my actual real life here too so am going to post a...
From: Madame Guillotine on 30 Jun 2014

Leonard Morse

Leonard Morse (? –1808) was another of the signatories to Joshua Kirby’s application to become a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1767. He himself had been elected the previous year, his citation reading:     Leonard Morse Esqr of Queen Anne...
From: Kirby and his world on 27 Jun 2014

Sherlock Holmes, October 2014

Exciting news for all fans of Sherlock Holmes and come on, let’s face it, who ISN’T a fan?! Oh, shush, you at the back. Anyway, the much anticipated Museum of London exhibition about our favourite super sleuth is kicking off on the 17th of...
From: Madame Guillotine on 18 Jun 2014

The Tower of London

Oh dear, this post is REALLY late but I do hope that you’ll all forgive me as I’ve been working so hard on my next book that my blogging activities have slipped away somewhat. Well those days are OVER. Those days are DONE. I’m back...
From: Madame Guillotine on 18 Jun 2014

John Smeaton

John Smeaton (1724—1792) was the first to use ‘Civil Engineer’ as a title. He is now most famous for his rebuilding of the Eddystone Ligthhouse after it burned down in 1755. However, Smeaton was an incredibly industrious man, racking up...
From: Kirby and his world on 16 Jun 2014

Telling History versus Story Telling

The Kenwood portrait of Dido and Elizabeth, now at Scone Palace and attributed to Zoffany I have just been to see the film Belle, the story of Dido Elizabeth Belle, the illegitimate great niece of Lord Mansfield, daughter of a black mother, and the sparkling...
From: A Parcel of Ribbons on 15 Jun 2014

Thomas Anguish

Thomas Anguish (1724—1785) FRS was a barrister who rose to become Accountant-General to the Court of Chancery. Originally from Beccles in Suffolk he was the only son of Thomas Anguish and Mary Elmy. His great-grandfather had married into the Allin family...
From: Kirby and his world on 11 Jun 2014

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Notes on Post Tags Search

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag/category for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event hashtag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.