The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "london"

Your search for posts with tags/categories containing london found 356 posts

Showing 1 - 20 of 356

Personnel of the Office of Works

In the last post, I talked about the organizational structure of the Office of Works and we have seen the ripple effects of Kirby’s appointment as Clerk of the Works at Richmond and Kew. As all the Clerks of the Works attended a monthly meeting...
From: Kirby and his world on 29 Aug 2014

The Saddest Place in London: A Story of Self-Sacrifice

Tucked away in a quiet area of East London is a peaceful place that goes by the unassuming name of Postman’s Park (left), so called because it once stood in the shadow of the city’s old General Post Office building. At first glance, you might...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 29 Aug 2014

The Structure of the Office of Works

Between the reforms of 1719 and the Economical Reform of 1782, the Office of Works did not change in organization very much. The Board was formed of the Surveyor General, the Comptroller, the Master Mason, and the Master Carpenter. The organization and...
From: Kirby and his world on 27 Aug 2014

Walpole on Pitt on Shakespeare

Horace Walpole’s Memoirs of George II provides a detailed, if biased and not always accurate, view of politics in the 1750s. In his description of the debates in parliament on the treaties preparatory to the Seven Years’ War, Walpole records...
From: Kirby and his world on 25 Aug 2014

Office of Works: Departmental Appointments

The Surveyor-General of the Office of Works was appointed by the King, but lesser departmental appointments, such as Joshua Kirby’s to Clerk of the Works at Richmond and Kew, were ordered by the Surveyor-General. The official record of these appointments...
From: Kirby and his world on 22 Aug 2014

Joseph Phillips

Joshua Kirby’s Labourer in Trust at Richmond and Kew was Joseph Phillips. They did not always get along. When Kirby was appointed Clerk of the Works in 1761, Phillips had already been Labourer in Trust for fifteen years. He was appointed to the...
From: Kirby and his world on 18 Aug 2014

Eighteenth-Century Salaries

In 1761, Joshua Kirby and his son William were appointed joint Clerks of the Works and Storekeepers at Richmond and Kew. The two positions of Richmond and Kew always went together, with that of Richmond being considered the more important. Later in the...
From: Kirby and his world on 16 Aug 2014

Clerk of the Works at Richmond and Kew

The various palaces and estates of the royal household were managed by the Office of Works, headed by a Surveyor-General. Each location was supervised by a Clerk of the Works, usually with the assistance of a Labourer in Trust. The Clerk of the Works...
From: Kirby and his world on 14 Aug 2014

Richard Harper of West Smithfield

A Farthing token of Richard Harper at the sign of the Harp in West Smithfield The above copper farthing token measures 15.5 mm in diameter and weighs 0.96 grams. On purely stylistic grounds it would appear to date from the 1650s. It was issued by Richard...
From: Mr. Pepys' Small Change on 11 Aug 2014

Royal Childhood at Buckingham Palace

‘From well-loved toys and treasured family gifts to tiny childhood outfits, a special exhibition at Buckingham Palace will give an unprecedented glimpse into life as a young member of the royal family growing up at Buckingham Palace.’ I’m...
From: Madame Guillotine on 28 Jul 2014

Shakespeare in Love – the play

A scene from the stage version of Shakespeare In Love This evening, 23 July, is the official opening of the new London West End play Shakespeare in Love, Lee Hall’s new version of the much-loved 1998 film of the same name. Rumours have been circulating...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 23 Jul 2014

Don Giovanni in Flanders

Spanish attack on a Flemish village,Attr:  Pieter Snayers.In the winter of 1603-04, Glassmaker Antonio Neri embarked on what would become a seven-year-long visit to Antwerp to stay with his friend, Emmanuel Ximenes, one of the richest men in...
From: Conciatore on 23 Jul 2014

The Windsor Nell Gwynn Knew

As royal mistresses go, Nell Gwynn is probably our most favourite of King Charles II's mistresses - and with good reason. This saucy, funny, beautiful actress was quite a loveable character - and her royal lover certainly knew that. John Evelyn referred...
From: Hoydens and Firebrands on 20 Jul 2014

Henry Stebbing

The Rev. Henry Stebbing (1716—1787), FRS, FSA, seems to have been as mild and pleasant a man as he is said by his son to have been. His personality may have been influenced by that of his father, Rev. Henry Stebbing (1687—1763), who was anything but....
From: Kirby and his world on 18 Jul 2014

Giordano Bruno turns detective: a review of S. J. Parris’ Heresy, Prophecy, Sacrilege and Treachery

S.J. Parris, the pseudonym for Stephanie Merrit, is writing in the fairly crowded market of the historical/religious murder mystery, which brings with it both a potentially very loyal group of readers, or a series of comparisons to such writers as C.J....
From: renaissanceissues on 18 Jul 2014

Conference Favourites from ‘Revisiting Early Modern Prophecies’

This year’s conference season was brief but intense for me, with conferences back to back in London and Görlitz. Instead of writing about my own talks, I’ve decided instead to highlight a few papers by other scholars that I particularly enjoyed....
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 12 Jul 2014

Conference Favourites from ‘Revisiting Early Modern Prophecies’

This year’s conference season was brief but intense for me, with conferences back to back in London and Görlitz. Instead of writing about my own talks, I’ve decided to highlight a few papers by other scholars that I particularly enjoyed....
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 12 Jul 2014

Lies, secrets and death on the eve of the Glorious Revolution

The Bitter Trade by Piers Alexander is a historical novel set in the murky world of London’s coffee houses on the eve of the Glorious Revolution. The son of an English dissenter and a French Huguenot, its young redhead hero Calumny Spinks lives under...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 10 Jul 2014

George Carpenter, Mealman of Wapping

A farthing token issued by George Carpenter – A mid-17th century grain dealer of Wapping, London. The above copper farthing token measures 15.6 mm in diameter and weighs 0.80 grams. It was most likely issued in the 1650s. The token was issued by...
From: Mr. Pepys' Small Change on 9 Jul 2014

St. Thomas More to His Daughter Meg

Beyond his martyrdom and his status as a patron saint, Thomas More provides us with such examples of humanity that tear the veil between us and the past. On July 5, 1535, the day before his execution, he wrote to his daughter Margaret, commenting...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag/category for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event hashtag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.