The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "london"

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Your search for posts with tags containing london found 626 posts

Generic excitement

Give ear, I pray you, and mark it attentively, for you shall hear the tenor of a strange and tragical comedy. Anthony Munday, Zelauto (1580) Genre: what is it, what does it mean, and how does it organise our experiences in the theatre, in a book or in...
From: Before Shakespeare on 27 Apr 2017

Birthday Post: A Year of Before Shakespeare

We launched our website last year, on the date of Shakespeare’s 400th anniversary, with an introduction to the project and something of a provocation in Andy’s post about putting the Shhhh into Shakespeare…. The comments that followed...
From: Before Shakespeare on 23 Apr 2017

A Pretty Paisley Print Ditty Bag

I recently purchased this charming late 19th century (or very early 20th century) work bag (also called a ditty bag). The intricate paisley-style, polished sateen cotton print was visually pleasing with its pinks, reds and greens. Each side features a...
From: SilkDamask on 15 Apr 2017

On the Women’s Petition Against Coffee of 1674

“That Newfangled, Abominable, Heathenish Liquor called COFFEE.” Imagine a space where you can bet on bear fights, warm your legs by the fire, witness public dissections (human and animal), solicit prostitutes (male and female), buy and sell...
From: Res Obscura on 8 Apr 2017

Hamlet at the Almeida: A review by @EmiGarside

A review by Dr Emily Garside Hamlet is a play that is familiar even to those with no direct experience of the play – whether it’s a general knowledge of a much-adapted plot or the countless lines that have made it into common usage. So it...
From: Cardiff Shakespeare on 2 Apr 2017

Henry E. Huntington, the Greatest Book Collector

In “Why America buys England’s books,” a 1927 article in the Atlantic Monthly, Philadelphia bookseller Rosenbach wrote that Henry E. Huntington was the “greatest collector of books the world has ever known.” The London Times...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 28 Mar 2017

March 27

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Genuine Medeira, Tenerif, and Fayal Wines, per Pipe or lesser Quantity.” New-London Gazette (March 27, 1767)Winthrop and Roswell Saltonstall’s advertisement for...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 Mar 2017

Women Petitioners: London Servants

I’m going to round off WHM2017 with a couple of posts indulging my current interests in petitions. Today I have two petitions from the London Lives Petitions Project: both are from working women who petitioned London magistrates for help after their...
From: Early Modern Notes on 26 Mar 2017

Too good to not share…

The Museum of London leather jerkin in close up photographs. Thanks to the Archaeological Leather Group for pointing it out. Filed under: Big Book of Leather Chapters, Clothing, Late Medieval, Leather

March 25

GUEST CURATOR: Ceara Morse What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (March 25, 1767).“HENRY SNOW, Distiller from London, MAKES and SELLS … FINE Georgia Geneva.” Henry Snow distilled many...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Mar 2017

Mourning Children with Objects

By Jennifer Jorm, The University of Queensland   High rates of infant and child mortality did not numb parents to the loss of their children. Mourning tokens commissioned after the death of children, and the identification tokens left with children...
From: Histories of Emotion on 10 Mar 2017

Post from the Past 2: A Week in the Life of William Fleetwood

Fleetwood to Burghley, 1584. William Fleetwood was a significant figure in Elizabethan London.  He studied in early life at Eton and Oxford before attending the Middle Temple and being called to the bar there in 1551.  He was a freeman...
From: Before Shakespeare on 20 Feb 2017

The Adamses: “quite out of their element”

MARY HILL LAMAR wrote again from London to her brother Henry Hill in Philadelphia this time including a couple of catty remarks about John and Abigail Adams as well as Ann Willing Bingham and her husband, said to be the wealthiest man in America. London,...
From: In the Words of Women on 16 Feb 2017

“The India counterpanes make very pretty curtains . . . “

The last two posts have focused on Dr. Richard Hill and his family. When Hill and his wife left the country for Madeira to escape his creditors his large family was broken up. Seven of his nine children remained in America under the care of his daughter...
From: In the Words of Women on 13 Feb 2017

Other South American Rivers are Available

I don’t usually plug other people’s books on this site, but occasionally, titles come along that really deserve a bit of a leg-up – especially if they fall within my usual very strict and narrow remits (i.e. seventeenth century, naval,...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 13 Feb 2017

Patricia Fumerton on Moving Media

At the end of January, I happened to be down in London for a Historical Association committee meeting, so I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to go to the London Renaissance Seminar in order to hear Patricia Fumerton talk about ‘Moving Media,...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 12 Feb 2017

The London Lives Petitions Project: What can you do with 10,000 18th-century petitions?

A very late note that I blogged about my petitions over at the many-headed monster in November 2016. the many-headed monster Our next post in the Addressing Authority Online Symposium has been written by Sharon Howard, an early modern historian and...
From: Early Modern Notes on 10 Feb 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.