The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "medical history"

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Your search for posts with tags containing medical history found 86 posts

‘Direful Attendants’: The Great Pox and Shame

‘The pestilent infection of filthy lust’  – William Clowes, A … treatise touching the cure of the disease called (morbus gallicus) (London, 1579). ‘[the great pox] has the direful Attendants of Shame, Reproach...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 28 Jul 2017

Everyday Heroes: A Story of Self-Sacrifice & Bubonic Plague

On 1 November 1666, a young farmer named Abraham Morten took one final, agonizing breath. He was the last of 260 people to die of bubonic plague in the remote village of Eyam in Derbyshire. His fate had been sealed four months earlier when villagers decided...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 6 Jul 2017

An unexpectedly fashionable career

If asked today to list fashionable careers, it is highly unlikely that any of us would include ‘syphilis specialist’ in our list. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries the prevalence of the disease in British society and the ongoing...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 11 Jun 2017

Remembering Michael Bliss

Elsbeth Heaman In recent years I’ve sometimes had the feeling that I’m stalking Michael Bliss. Time and again I’ve wandered into a particular historical thicket, and found that he had been there ahead of me. It wasn’t purposeful,...
From: Borealia on 20 May 2017

The Butchering Art – UK Cover Reveal!

I’m thrilled to reveal the UK cover for my upcoming book THE BUTCHERING ART, which will be published by Allen Lane, an imprint of Penguin, on October 17th. The book tells the story of the surgeon Joseph Lister and his quest to transform the brutal...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 12 May 2017

Barbers and Shaving in early modern Britain.

As the beards project rolls merrily forward, I’ve recently been turning my attention to barbers in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Over the past few months I’ve been looking at a large number of sources relating to barbers and barber-surgeons,...
From: DrAlun on 3 Apr 2017

Medical Fascinations, Human Lives: Hunter’s Syphilis Specimens

Should you visit The Hunterian Museum you can come face to face with victims of the great pox (syphilis). As you enter the main museum from the staircase, to the left hand side, on the topmost shelf of a cabinet containing a series of human specimens...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 12 Mar 2017

Under The Knife, Episode 11 – Abraham Lincoln’s Corpse

In Episode 11 of Under The Knife, I explore the origins of the modern funeral industry beginning with the American Civil War and the unusual embalming & burial of President Abraham Lincoln. Don’t forget you can now pre-order my book THE BUTCHERING...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 23 Feb 2017

Pre-Order My Book! The Butchering Art

I’m thrilled to reveal the cover for the US edition of my forthcoming book, THE BUTCHERING ART, which will be published by FSG on October 17th. The book delves into the grisly world of Victorian surgery and transports the reader to a period...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 16 Feb 2017

Syphilis: A Little Valentine’s Day Love Story

Photo Credit: The Royal College of Surgeons of England  We don’t know much about her. We don’t even know her name. What we do know is that the woman who wore the above prosthetic in the mid-19th century was suffering from a severe case...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 14 Feb 2017

The Surgeon who Operated on Himself

Leonid Ivanovich Rogozov (pictured above and below right) knew he was in trouble when he began experiencing intense pain in lower right quadrant of his abdomen. He had been feeling unwell for several days, but suddenly, his temperature skyrocketed and...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 16 Jan 2017

Sick Servants in Early Modern Britain

Historians have done lots of work in recent years on health and medical care in the family in early modern Britain. As such we know much more about what life was like for the sick in the early modern home, how patients were cared for and by whom. The...
From: DrAlun on 11 Jan 2017

Under The Knife – Reboot!

It’s been 18 months since I’ve filmed an episode of my YouTube series, Under The Knife. But that ends today! Check out the trailer to the series reboot, which may or may not involve my severed head. A NEW episode is coming next week....
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 8 Dec 2016

“We Have Conquered Pain!” The Uses & Abuses of Ether in History

The surgical revolution began with an American dentist and a curiously sweet-smelling liquid known as ether. Officially, ether had been discovered in 1275, but its stupefying effects weren’t synthesized until 1540, when the German botanist and chemist...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 30 Nov 2016

Movember Special: Hiding Behind the Beard

It’s November, and that time of year when men all over the world will be donning moustaches to raise money for, and awareness of, prostate cancer, through Movember. Get ready for a raft of valiant efforts, with some maybe even graduating to the...
From: DrAlun on 1 Nov 2016

The Medicalization of Death in History

When the Black Death swept through Europe in the 14th century, it claimed the lives of over 75 million people, many of who were clergymen whose job it was to help usher the dying into the next world. In response to the shortage of priests, the Ars Moriendi...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 30 Aug 2016

‘Hypochondriacal People’: Lives Haunted by the Pox

These dreadful Apprehensions have frequently possesst the Imaginations of some People that had taken the way to get the Pox, so, as to be soon perswaded they have it, whether it be so or no.John Marten, A Treatise of all the Degrees and Symptoms of the...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 15 Aug 2016

A (Very) Brief History of the Pox

In 1495 Europeans began to remark on the appearance of a new ‘terrifying, troublesome, and painful sickness’. Those afflicted suffered from aching bodies covered with ulcerations, and pustules which could ooze and stink. In its most horrific...
From: Pox and prejudice? on 21 Jul 2016

Fowl Medicine: The early modern ‘pigeon cure’

In October 1663 news spread around London that Queen Catherine was gravely ill. Fussed over by a gaggle of physicians and priests, things got so bad that Her Majesty was even given extreme unction in the expectation that she might not pull through. In...
From: DrAlun on 30 Jun 2016

Mangling the Dead: Dissection, Past & Present

I never feel more alive than when I am standing among the rows and rows of anatomical specimens in medical museums around London. In one jar floats the remains of an ulcerated stomach; in another, the hands of a suicide victim. Cabinets are...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 28 Jun 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.