The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "self-promotion"

Your search for posts with tags containing self-promotion found 9 posts

Now in Paperback: The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History

Moderate self-promotion alert: I’m happy to say that the paperback edition of this book will be out early next month. My own very modest contribution is a chapter on Restoration Ireland (1660-1688). I’m grateful to the editor, Alvin Jackson,...
From: memorious on 17 May 2017

The Dreaded Second Book

Forgive the self-indulgence of a post about my writing; but it’s my birthday, and I’ll cry if I want to. The hiatus in posts here began as a way of dealing with grading and continued as I shifted gears to the early summer “return to...
From: memorious on 10 May 2017

Don’t Make Graduate Students Freak Out about Publishing

Sometimes the title tells you all you really need to know. But I did write a little more on this than just the one line, and the piece — a draft of which I tried out here — is now in the Chronicle of Higher Education, in...
From: memorious on 9 Jan 2017

Happiness as a Colonial Science: new publication

In the wake of the Royal Society (London, 1660) and the Académie Royale (Paris, 1666), a slew of scientific societies formed in the later seventeenth-century European world, nodes in an expanding network of institutions devoted to experimental...
From: memorious on 21 Dec 2016

New Publication: Towards a History of Projects

In his 1697 Essay on Projects, Daniel Defoe referred to his era as the “The Projecting Age“: a time of schemes, plots and plans to make life (life in general, and the projector’s life in particular) better. Many projects...
From: memorious on 6 Dec 2016

Can I have my moment, please?

I've put months of effort into a new project at work that's been credited to half the organisation. What makes us go the extra mile when there's no guarantee of reward at the end of it? Continue reading →
From: Writing Privacy on 5 Nov 2016

New publication: Alchemical transmutation and economic value in the seventeenth century

Self-promotion alert! (But if I don’t tell you, who will?) I’m happy to say that a piece I wrote on two seventeenth-century scientific projectors, Gabriel Plattes (c.1600-44) and William Petty (1623-87), has at long last come out as a chapter...
From: memorious on 15 Sep 2016

When is calling yourself a failure a good thing?

Is it alright to brand yourself a failure in some things if you’re prepared to be a winner at others? Continue reading →
From: Writing Privacy on 17 Aug 2016

Self-promotion/free advice alert

Buy this book! Well, buy it if you have US$100/£65/C$115 that’s not destined for more pressing uses, like rent or food. Otherwise, look for it in a generously endowed academic library near you. It’s full of new and interesting thoughts...
From: memorious on 10 Jun 2016

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://commons.earlymodernweb.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.